XIII International Geographical Union (IGU)-India International Conference on Heading towards Zero: Sustainable Development in Economy, Environment and Society October, 19th -21st, 2019


19th June 2019

XIII International Geographical Union (IGU)-India International Conference on Heading towards Zero: Sustainable Development in Economy, Environment and Society
October, 19th -21st, 2019

In collaboration with IGU Commissions-

Commission on Biogeography and Biodiversity, Commission on local and regional development Commission on population Geography, Commission on Geo-heritage
&
Association of Geographical Studies (AGS)

Further information: First circular XIII International Geographical Union (IGU)-India

Registration form is available at university website (www.cuh.ac.in)

Important dates:
Abstract submission: 15 July 2019
Abstract Acceptance: 01 August 2019
Full paper Submission: 15 September 2019
Conference Date: 19, 20 &21 October 2019

IGU CDES 2019 Budapest Mini Conference on Rethinking Economic Geography in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Manufacturing, Entrepreneurship, Employment and Industry 4.0


18th June 2019

IGU CDES 2019 Budapest Mini Conference on Rethinking Economic Geography in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Manufacturing, Entrepreneurship, Employment and Industry 4.0

Local Organizer:

Prof. Dr. Eva Kiss

October 2-4, 2019 Budapest (Hungary)

under the umbrella of

the International Geographical Union (IGU) Commission on ‘The Dynamics of Economic Spaces’ (DES)

IGU-CDES website: http://igu-cdes.ankara.edu.tr/

Call for Papers

Important deadlines:
Deadline for Abstracts: 10 July, 2019
Notification about acceptance: 20 July, 2019
Registration deadline: 15 August, 2019
Date of Conference: 2-4 October, 2019
Final version of papers: 30 November, 2019
Publishing can be expected in 2020.

19th International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling


17th June 2019

19th International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling

Dear Committee Members;

I am an Assist. Prof. at Sakarya University Geography Department.

We plan to organize the “19th International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling”  in Sakarya in 2020. It will be 2 days before from 34th INTERNATIONAL GEOGRAPHICAL CONGRESS” to be held in Istanbul in 2020. 

You can find announcement below:

19th International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling

and “http://sdh2020.sakarya.edu.tr” is our web page. 

I would be very happy if the first calls of Congress were announced in your country.

IAG2019 Early bird rate closing May 22 2019


17th May 2019

Don’t miss your LAST opportunity to register at the EARLY BIRD RATE for this year’s Institute of Australian Geographers Conference, themed ‘Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence’. 
 
Check out the diverse and engaging 2019 program which is now online at www.iagc2019.com 

earlybird

IAG2019 Postgraduates Pre-conference Event


14th May 2019

IAG2019 Postgraduates Pre-conference Event

For those attending the Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference in Hobart, there is an exciting postgraduate pre-conference event on the 9th July 10:30am-3:30pm, on campus. The conference proper will commence directly after at 5pm at Wrest Point. If you would like to find out more, or register to attend, details are here:

https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/iag2019-postgraduates-pre-conference-event-tickets-61699952218

Call for Nominations for Awards of the IAG


1st March 2019

Call for Nominations for Awards of the IAG

Members are invited to nominate their esteemed colleagues for the following awards:  

  • The GRIFFITH TAYLOR Medal is awarded for distinguished contributions to geography in Australia.
  • AUSTRALIA-INTERNATIONAL MEDAL is for outstanding contributions by Australian geographers to geography world-wide, or by geographers outside Australia to the geography of Australia.
  • DISTINGUISHED FELLOWSHIP OF THE INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIAN GEOGRAPHERS (DFIAG) is awarded for distinguished service to Australian geography through furthering the aims of the Institute.
  • The FELLOWSHIP OF THE INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIAN GEOGRAPHERS (FIAG) recognizes sustained service to the profession of geography in Australia.

Further details of all awards, including nomination details and requirements, are available from: https://www.iag.org.au/about/awards-of-the-iag/

The closing date for all nominations is Friday 29 March 2019.

Nominations should be sent to the Honorary Secretary, Jennifer Carter, at jcarter@usc.edu.au

For further enquiries about these awards, please contact either the IAG President, Beverley Clarke beverley.clarke@flinders.edu.au or the Secretary, Jennifer Carter at jcarter@usc.edu.au

IAG 2019 Hobart: Call for Abstracts Extended 18th March 2019


27th February 2019

Please note that the deadline for abstract submissions for the IAG conference in Hobart this year has been extended until 18th March 2019.

You can download an updated conference flyer by clicking on the following link: IAG 2019 Abstract Extension: https://www.iag.org.au/client_images/2110834.jpg

New Urban Natures: Volatile Worlds - Public Lecture and Symposium, University of Wollongong


15th February 2019

New Urban Natures: Volatile Worlds - Public Lecture and Symposium, University of Wollongong

New Urban Natures: Volatile Worlds
Public Lecture and Symposium
Friday 22 February
University of Wollongong

Public Lecture: Prof. Harriet Bulkeley, ‘Nature's New Urban Politics' (9-10:30am)

Symposium:
Due to some late cancellations, we have places available in the full-day symposium, with:
Harriet Bulkeley, Nicole Cook, Benjamin Cook, Aidan Davison, Donna Houston, Ryan Jones, Cecilly Maller, Catherine Phillips, Libby Porter.

Information about both events, and to register, here:
https://socialsciences.uow.edu.au/access/events/index.html

Contact Leah Gibbs for more info leah@uow.edu.au

Looking forward to welcoming you.
Leah Gibbs, Pauline McGuirk, Jenny Atchison, Chantel Carr
Convenors

2 CfPs IAG2019- Race and 'abundant futures'; Decolonising the University


8th February 2019

2 CfPs IAG2019: Race and 'abundant futures'; Decolonising the University

Dear friends

We need your abstracts (150 words) for the following sessions to go ahead ! Would be delighted if you could upload it on the conference website  https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts by 28 February 2019.

Title: ‘Abundant Futures’: The ethico-political potential of thinking with race
(Sponsored by the Cultural Geography and Urban Geography Study Groups)

Organisers: Michele Lobo, Ashraful Alam, Donna Houston, Andrew Burridge

In an increasingly mobile world cities are sites of difference, encounter and struggle - humans/nonhumans, nature/culture and the dominant/subaltern. Often the imperialist force of race, white politics and racial capitalism exacerbates the struggle while entangled with popular as well as state anxieties about indigenous recognition, immigration, asylum seeker-refugee policies, Islam and national security. Drawing on more-than-human perspectives this session asks: what are the possibilities for inhabiting our planetary home in ways that move beyond (eco-)apocalyptic futures? We welcome papers that seek ethico-political spaces of abundance in the Anthropocene through engagements with diverse traditions of thought from the Global North/South.

2) Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis

(Sponsored by the Cultural Geography, Urban Geography, Indigenous Peoples’ Knowledge and Rights Study Groups)

Organisers: Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry

‘Once upon a time scholars assumed that if you ‘come’ from Latin America you have to ‘talk about’ Latin America; that in such a case you have to be a token of your culture. Such expectation will not arise if the author ‘comes’ from Germany, France, England or the US’

(Walter D Mignolo, 2009)

In this session we ask: If decolonisation is about proliferating planetary imaginaries of being and becoming otherwise, what are the practices we must engage in to decolonise the university. Such a question is crucial when neoliberal pressures and the reproduction of academic practices of privilege have the unintended effect of keeping racial hierarchies intact.  While focusing on the university might render us vulnerable, it is this site of vulnerability that has the capacity to mutate ‘decolonisation’ as more than another academic buzzword. Themes are unlimited but could include:

Please feel free to contact session convenors.

Thanks
Michele
(on behalf of session convenors)

CfP IAG2019: #Metoo: Exploring everyday negotiations of gender, space and place


8th February 2019

CFP: #Metoo: Exploring everyday negotiations of gender, space and place

Session Title: #Metoo: Exploring everyday negotiations of gender, space and place

Session Organisers: Ainsley Hughes, Melina Ey and Kathy Mee (University of Newcastle)

Abstract: Recent political, legal and social events that have coalesced around the #metoo movement have drawn fresh attention to the highly contested everyday geographies of gender. In this session, we seek to build on the path breaking work of feminist geographers who have long alerted us to the ongoing salience of gender as critical to embodied experiences of space and place. We invite papers which respond to this moment, by exploring gendered negotiations of everyday lives and everyday politics. We particularly welcome papers which explore intersectionality, affect, belonging and becoming, digital mediation/mobilisation, encounter, marginality, materialities, mobilities, more- than-human, resistance and urban/rural/remote wild and digital spaces. We also welcome papers that engage with the possibilities, joys, dilemmas and challenges of feminist methodologies and praxis. 

We welcome abstracts responding to the above call for papers. Please submit abstracts of 150 words to the conference website (https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts) and email a copy to the session organisers Ainsley Hughes (ainsley.hughes@uon.edu.au) and Melina Ey (melina.ey@uon.edu.au). Submission of abstracts closes 28 February 2019

Best wishes, Ainsley Hughes, Melina Ey and Kathy Mee

CfP IAG2019: A global Concept in local Contexts: Local understandings of sustainable development and its practice


8th February 2019

CfP IAG2019: A global Concept in local Contexts: Local understandings of sustainable development and its practice

Session Title: A global Concept in local Contexts: Local understandings of sustainable development and its practice
Session Organiser: Jerome Jeffison Ofori (University of Adelaide)

Call for Abstracts/Papers
Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference
Wrest Point, Tasmania
9-13 July 2019

Session Abstract

Sustainable development has evolved to become the dominant concept in planning and policy decisions.  Within the context of global and national discourse, sustainable development is “an article of faith, a shibboleth; often used but little explained” (Tolba 1984). Despite the evolution of the concept, the following questions remain- sustainable development for who, on whose definitions or terms and whose interests? This session aims at providing a more nuanced understanding of how sustainable development is conceived by different actors and how this plays out in practice within the socio-economic and political context of local communities. Papers that examine discursive representations of sustainable development in practice, the politics of its governance and its differentiated impacts on groups of people are welcomed.

Please submit abstracts of 150 words to the conference website (https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts). Submission of abstracts closes 28 February 2019. Please circulate this call  to your colleagues and students who may be interested.

If you have any questions at all or comments, please do not hesitate to email; jerome.ofori@adelaide.edu.au

Kind regards
Jerome Jeffison Ofori
PhD Candidate
Geography, Environment and Population
University of Adelaide
Adelaide, 5005
Ph: +61 406709674
Email:jerome.ofori@adelaide.edu.au

CfP IAG2019: Emerging geographies of protected areas


8th February 2019

CfP IAG2019: Emerging geographies of protected areas

Session Title: Emerging geographies of protected areas
Session Organisers: Aidan Davison (University of Tasmania) & Benjamin Cooke (RMIT)


Session Abstract
The global protected area conservation estate has changed greatly since the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity. An array of non-government actors have worked with governments to increase the diversity and extent of protected land and sea tenures. In Australia, the Indigenous protected area estate has recently grown larger than the public estate. This session brings geographical analysis to bear on these changes. Papers from across the discipline and cognate areas could address the following areas of focus (but feel free to suggest more):

•             Nature conservation outcomes

•             Neoliberal conservation strategies

•             The socio-ecology of Indigenous Protected Areas

•             The socio-ecology of Private Protected Areas

•             Protected Areas in the Anthropocene

•             The conservancy sector

Please submit abstracts of 150 words to the conference website (https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts). Submission of abstracts closes 28 February 2019. Please circulate this call to your colleagues and students who may be interested.

If you have any questions at all or comments, please do not hesitate to email: Aidan.Davison@utas.edu.au or ben.cooke@rmit.edu.au

CfP IAG2019: Nature, Risk and Resilience Study Group-supported sessions


8th February 2019

CfP - Nature, Risk and Resilience Study Group-supported sessions, IAG2019, Hobart

Dear all

The Nature, Risk and Resilience study groupis supporting an exciting array of highly topical, intra-disciplinary sessions at the upcoming 2019 IAG in Hobart which promise to help explore the conference theme of Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence

https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts 

Please read about them below and consider submitting an abstract (or two!). Abstracts are due Feb 28th.

Please also get in touch to join our study group, we would love to have you involved.

Best,
Lauren
On behalf of the IAG Nature, Risk and Resilience study group

IAG 2019 NRR CONFERENCE SESSIONS 

All at Sea? Established and emerging concepts and practices in marine governance 

Convenors: Jim Sinner, Cawthron Institute; Marc Tadaki, Cawthron Institute 

Concepts of governance do more than just describe the world; they order the world by embedding specific human-nonhuman relations into positions of priority and normality. This session will interrogate both established and emerging concepts – _and their associated practices – _in marine governance. 

We invite contributions on topics including, but not limited to: 

·       Indigenous marine geographies

·       Co-governance approaches

·       Marine policy and institutions

·       Blue economy

·       Marine planning

·       Participation and decision making

·       Ecosystem-based management

·       Social licence to operate

·       Human-human and human-nonhuman interactions 

·       Environmental valuation

·       Marine commons

·       Noise and plastic pollution, offshore mining, deep sea fishing 

Climate change impacts in natural and human systems 

Co-convenors: Christopher Watson, Rebecca Harris 

Climate change is altering regional and local climates in complex ways, with consequent impacts on natural (e.g., forests, rivers or ice sheets) and human systems (e.g., agriculture or hydroelectricity generation). This session will explore observed and/or projected impacts of climate change and possible adaptation measures to mitigate them.

Climate justice & representation of future generations in climate planning 

Convenor: Peter Lawrence, UTAS

Exploring ideas and models for representing future generations in climate change planning in Tasmania and beyond.

Coasts and Wetlands 

Convenor: Vishnu Prahalad, University of Tasmania 

Coasts and wetlands are dynamic environments that are in the frontline of changes caused by anthropogenic land use expansion and the effects of climate change and sea level rise. Geographers have a critical role to play in these environs to balance and sustain human uses through increasing our understanding of scale- and place-dependent social and ecological processes. There is now an  increasing need for both ‘human’ and ‘physical’ geographers to work together closely to provide a more systemic understanding necessary for designing effective policy and other interventions that would promote sustainable use of our treasured coasts and wetlands. 

Convergences and divergences in the role of race and class in environmental justice research 

Convenor: Mark-Stanton Bailey, Griffith University 

Environmental justice as a social movement, and a field of study, has its roots in the United States Civil Rights Movement. Resistance to environmental racism, particularly the disproportionate distribution of harmful industries and locally unwanted land uses in marginalised and disadvantaged communities, has been at the heart of the social movement and EJ research more broadly. But the internationalisation of environmental justice research has arguably shifted this focus. This session calls for contributions that explore the evolving consideration of race in environmental justice research as well as other axes of difference (e.g. class, gender, ability, age etc.) and welcomes efforts to enhance and extend this field of research.

Environmental management in dynamic social-ecological systems 

Convenor: Vanessa Adams, University of Tasmania 

Conservation and environmental management depends upon an understanding of the biogeography of species; how actions can counteract threats to species loss and maintain natural assemblages of species; and the social values placed on these systems and how this influences communities and individuals to support these actions (or not). Thus, conservation and environmental management sit at the cross section of physical and human geography. This session will include talks on fundamental physical geography that helps us understand the distribution of species, and those places that are most in need of action, as well as human geography that helps us to understand how different people relate to nature and what types of action are most resonant with communities, and lastly studies that intersect these two types of approaches to design policies that account for the social-ecological systems that they sit within.

Geographies of participation: practices, publics, power, and politics 

Convenors: Matthew Kearnes, Tim Neale, Noel Castree 

Publics are made. They emerge when researchers, practitioners, and innumerable factors come together with purpose. Like the societies from which they emerge, publics are not necessarily ‘good’ or ‘progressive;’ and even when purportedly altruistic there are always power hierarchies that exclude and advantage some publics over other publics (Chilvers & Kearnes, 2016). There are winner and there are losers, and the aspiration of ‘win-win’, while noble, is rarely realized. What then of the long sought-after promise of participation? 

In general, the turn towards participation has prompted significant and effective critique of existing knowledge-power and associated practices. The discourse has also criticised itself, attacking technocratic versions of participation that focus on methods and techniques designed to realise expert- or elite-determined objectives (Chilvers & Kearnes, in review). Critics of participation have also demonstrated how economic calculations impose boundaries that protect existing practices (Lane, Landström, & Whatmore, 2011), while others have shown that an emphasis on technologies and ‘apps’ more often entrench existing power than challenge it (Swyngedouw 2005). Despite its many faults and compelling critiques, participation remains a promising and tantalisingly-close alternative to prevailing practices. Furthermore, the emergence and entrenchment of populism and post-truth politics mean that opportunities for collaboration are especially important. 

The proposed session(s) and panel on the geographies of participation call for researchers (and others) who remain optimistic. We propose an opportunity for those working in the context of participation to, themselves, converge with the aim of presenting and debating a renewed promise of participation. Contributions are sought from across the geographical discipline from those using and analysing participation, including theoretical, methodological, and case-based contributions. We are seeking presentations that explore the practices and pathways that can be built upon, especially those that combine reconceptualisations that advance the promise of participation or that challenge prevailing practices (Cook & Overpeck, accepted). We envision those drawing upon citizen science, citizen juries, theories of ‘opening/closing’ and/or ‘upstream/downstream’ conceptualisations, but are open to all who associate with participation. 

In addition to standard paper presentations, we will attempt to produce a commentary for The Conversation that explores the lingering promise of participation in the context of emerging populism, nationalism, the (purported) polarisation of society, increased inequality, and democracy. If there is interest, we will also develop a proposal for a special issue.

Landscape narratives: stories of convergent connections 

Convenors: Dr Eloise Biggs (University of Western Australia), Dr Jennifer Bond (Charles Sturt University) and Dr Aysha Fleming (CSIRO). 

People have strong dependent connections to landscapes for sustaining their everyday livelihoods and wellbeing. Stories of landscape values, interactions and belonging are important for enhancing our collective understanding of human-environment relations. In this session we request your insights which identify where research is having demonstrable impact on society under emerging landscape management challenges. Such challenges exist across a plethora of geographical discourse, from the tangible health implications of food insecurity and urban air pollution, to the emotive reactions of lost species diversity and personal responsibility felt to address urgent global crises like plastic proliferation and climate change. We encourage abstract submissions which provide a strong narrative for communicating participatory landscape research stories whereby the research impact on landscape actors and their environment is narrated. Here we define a landscape at any geographical scale whereby such interactions occur e.g. cityscape, river catchment, island etc. This session will follow a Talanoa dialogue* format and creativity in presentation style is encouraged for telling a compelling story. Through the research impact stories presented, storytellers and session attendees will be able to thread together convergent connections across different landscape narratives to learn from collective experiences. 

* The purpose of Talanoa, as defined by the UNFCCC, is to ‘share stories, build empathy and to make wise decisions for the collective good. The purpose of Talanoa involves the sharing of ideas, skills and experiences through storytelling.

New geographies of environmental sustainability, risk and resilience 

Convenor: Lauren Rickards, RMIT 

New geographies of risk, resilience and sustainability are emerging as socio-political actors of various sorts try to keep up with rapidly changing physical contexts and shifting societal expectations about them. In some cases, new relations and societal responses are being triggered by growing certainties; in others by unsettling new phenomena, questions and concerns. 

This session welcomes empirical and conceptual papers that explore how approaches to and ideas about sustainability, risk and resilience are changing, especially how they are diverging and/or converging. It welcomes papers from various perspectives (e.g. legal, social, cultural, political, physical), especially those that generate dialogue across subdisciplines.

Place-based Climate Change Education 

Convenor: Roger Baars, Kyoto University, Japan 

Increasing global environmental, social and economic risks due to climate change have resulted in climate change education (CCE) to be integrated into most geography syllabi today. Research on place-based education claims people who feel connected to their local environment show higher intentions to engage in pro-environmental actions and are more willing to change their behaviors. Therefore, we need to explore how to teach climate change in a way that translates the abstract and distant problem into localized everyday experiences. Purpose of the session is to share current CCE practices and to explore their impact on students’ attitudes, perceptions and behaviours. 

Dr Lauren Rickards
Associate Professor, Sustainability & Urban Planning
Co-leader, Climate Change & Resilience Research Prog., Centre for Urban Research http://cur.org.au/people/

Co-leader, RMIT Regional Futures Network, https://regionalfuturesnetwork.wordpress.com/
Co-convenor, Nature, Risk and Resilience Study Group, Institute of Australian Geographers

CfP IAG2019: New and Emerging Research in Cultural Geography


8th February 2019

CFP IAG2019: New and Emerging Research in Cultural Geography

Session: New and Emerging Research in Cultural Geography
Convenors
IAG Cultural Geography Study Group Convenors:

Michele Lobo (michele.lobo@deakin.edu.au)
Michelle Duffy (michele.duffy@newcastle.edu.au)
vickie Zhang (vzhang@student.unimelb.edu.au)

In this session we provide a forum for postgraduates, early career researchers and research leaders to come together and showcase recent cutting-edge research in Cultural Geography in Australia, New Zealand and beyond. Cultural geography comprises a wide-ranging group of geographical sub-disciplines that engages with the arts, humanities, natural and social sciences. Cultural domains of geographical research continue to grow in breadth and depth, with expanding theoretical formulations, methodological approaches and fields of interest. Cultural geographers embrace the historical, material, digital, discursive and affective to advance understandings of place, space and the environment. These cultural dimensions are increasingly recognised across the full spectrum of geographical research, as seen in the emergence and growing popularity of research on

  • Elemental geographies, chemical becomings
  • Digital cultures and artificial intelligence
  • Infrastructures and the commons
  • Insights from feminism, feminist technoscience, Science and Technology Studies etc
  • Indigenous cultures, ethnic-minority cultures, energy cultures, food cultures, diasporic cultures, weather cultures, security/surveillance cultures
  • Mobilities
  • War, Terror, Extinction, Catastrophe and ‘Culturecide’
  • Dissent and activist solidarities; cultural justice
  • Tangible and intangible cultural heritage
  • Posthuman geographies, multispecies politics; animal geographies
  • New insights into gender/sexuality/race/ethnicity/religion
  • Experimental methodologies

We welcome your paper that expands the horizon of Cultural Geography! Standard papers/alternative formats welcome.

Please upload by 28 February 2019 at https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts.

For more information contact:

Michele Lobo (Michele.Lobo@deakin.edu.au), Michelle Duffy (Michelle.Duffy@newcastle.edu.au) and Vickie Zhang (vzhang@student.unimelb.edu.au)

CfP IAG2019: Sport geographies


8th February 2019

CfP IAG2019: Sport geographies

We invite submissions of abstracts to the call for papers below to be held at the 2019 Institute of Australian Geographers Conference (Hobart, Tasmania, July  9 to 13).

Session organisers: Adele Pavlidis and Jora Broerse

(Sponsored by the Cultural Geography Study Group)

Sport in Australia is intimately tied up with notions of pride, nationhood, and masculinity. As a field of study, sport geography is a site of emerging theories and concepts, diverging and converging with urban, social, cultural, emotional, economic, land-use, health and other geographies. From change rooms, to board rooms, sporting fields to dance halls, enfleshed bodies to digital sites, sport happens somewhere. This session calls for papers that explore the spatiality of sport, broadly defined to include team sports, individual pursuits and active leisure. 

Abstracts are due 28th February via the following link (you will create an account and then go on to submit your abstract, choosing 'Sport Geographies' in the drop down box) https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

If you have any questions at all or comments, please do not hesitate to email either of us, Adele Pavlidis a.pavlidis@griffith.edu.au and Jora Broese jozefien.broerse@live.vu.edu.au

Please pass on to your networks. Looking forward to seeing you in July! 
Adele Pavlidis and Jora Broese

CfP IAG2019: Tackling ethical and methodological challenges and possibilities in geographical research


8th February 2019

CFP IAG2019: Tackling ethical and methodological challenges and possibilities in geographical research

There is rarely a ‘box on the form’ for the ethical challenges which arise in geographical research. These challenges tend to be ‘dynamic, ongoing and complex’ (Gillan and Pickerill, 2012) rather than predictable. They concern the responsibilities of a researcher to her participants, but extend far beyond matters of informed consent. We invite presentations that draw on researchers’ fieldwork experiences, as well as those with a theoretical focus. Topics we are interested in include but are not limited to:

·       Decolonising methods

·       Over-researched people and places

·       Scholar-activism and the challenges of joining the struggle

·       Responsibilities beyond informed consent

·       Power differentials between researcher/researched, and amongst the researched

·       Writing unflattering accounts

·       Participant benefits

·       The neoliberal university and research ethics

·       Digital research methods and social media as data 

Abstracts are due 28th February via the following link (you will create an account and then go on to submit your abstract, choosing 'Tackling ethical and methodological challenges and possibilities in geographical research' in the drop down box): https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

Please contact Laura Wynne (laura.wynne@utas.edu.au) or Pratichi Chatterjee (pratichi.chatterjee@sydney.edu.au) with any questions about this session.

References and related reading

Ahmed, S. (2012). On being included: Racism and diversity in institutional life. Duke University Press.

Chatterton, P., Hodkinson, S., & Pickerill, J. (2010). Beyond scholar activism: Making strategic interventions inside and outside the Neoliberal University. ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, 9(2), 245–275.

de La Bellacasa, M. P. (2017). Matters of care: Speculative ethics in more than human worlds. U of Minnesota Press. 

Gillan, K., & Pickerill, J. (2012). The difficult and hopeful ethics of research on, and with, social movements. Social Movement Studies, 11(2), 133-143.

Haraway, D. J. (2016). Staying with the trouble: Making kin in the Chthulucene. Duke University Press. 

Nagar, R., & Geiger, S. (2007). Reflexivity and positionality in Feminist Fieldwork Revisited. In A. Tickell, E. Sheppard, J. Peck, & T. Barnes (Eds.), Politics and practice in economic geography (pp. 267–278). Los Angeles?; London: SAGE.

Neal, S., Mohan, G., Cochrane, A., & Bennett, K. (2016). ‘You can’t move in Hackney without bumping into an anthropologist’: why certain places attract research attention. Qualitative Research, 16(5), 491–507. 

Oldfield, S. (2015). Between activism and the academy: The urban as political terrain. Urban Studies, 52(11), 2072–2086. 

Routledge, P., & Derickson, K. D. (2015). Situated solidarities and the practice of scholar-activism. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 33(3), 391–407.

Sukarieh, M., & Tannock, S. (2013). On the problem of over-researched communities: The case of the Shatila Palestinian Refugee Camp in Lebanon. Sociology, 47(3), 494–508.

Tironi, M., & Rodríguez-Giralt, I. (2017). Healing, knowing, enduring: Care and politics in damaged worlds. The Sociological Review, 65(2_suppl), 89-109.

CfP IAG2019: Thinking Intersectionality in Critical Feminist Development Studies


8th February 2019

CFP IAG2019: Thinking Intersectionality in Critical Feminist Development Studies

Session name: Thinking Intersectionality in Critical Feminist Development Studies

Session proposer: Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt (Kuntala.Lahiri-Dutt@anu.edu.au

Session aims: This session invites short presentations that discuss the complex challenges arising from the application of intersectionality in critical feminist development studies. In particular, the session hopes to deliberate on the pros and cons of emerging possibilities to translate feminist theoretical insights into one or more analytical frameworks for applied use to carry out gender analysis for development projects.

Brief background: 'Intersectionality' implies 'the interaction between gender, race, and other categories of difference in individual lives, social practices, institutional arrangements, and cultural ideologies and the outcomes of these interactions in terms of power' (Davis 2008, p. 68). It offers an analytical framework to consider the interconnections among various forms of social stratification, such as class, race, sexual orientation, age, religion, creed, disability and gender to understand the ways they combine to create disadvantages for women (hooks 2000). Intersectionality has been described as a 'The greatest contribution [of feminist theorists] to social science as a whole' (Belkhir, 2009:3), yet others consider it as a 'buzzword' that is conceptually meaningful, yet extremely difficult to apply in measurable ways (May 2015). Yet, such is the popularity of the term that it has become, arguably, the new theoretical darling for feminists; a growing body of gender studies literature in developing country contexts attempts to break the prevalent sex-based binary to marry feminist theories with GAD practices. 

Possible points to discuss: In this context, the session aims to query: is it at all possible to develop a gender analytical framework that is based on the concept of intersectionality? Could such efforts ultimately depolicise feminist insights? How do we ourselves from the culture of indicators and quantitative metrices in applying the concept of intersectionality in their GAD work? How can such a framework be possibly applied by gender professionals and at what scales? Finally, what could  be the political implications for turning an advanced conceptualisation of gender identities into a replicable and measurable analytical tool? 

Additional questions addressed or challenges analysed are welcomed. 

Relevant information: Abstract can be submitted until 28 February, 2019. You will need to register and submit your abstract to the IAG website. Please send a copy to: Kuntala.Lahiri-Dutt@anu.edu.au 

Session is sponsored by Critical Geographies if Development and Cultural Geographies Study Groups.

IAG Website: https://www.iag.org.au/about  

Full details of the Conference: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag 

Register here: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/registration-2019/Site/Register 

CfP IAG2019: Urban environmental transformations in the Asia Pacific


8th February 2019

CfP IAG2019: Urban environmental transformations in the Asia Pacific

Session organisers: Ali Browne, University of Manchester and Sara Fuller, Macquarie University

Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, Hobart, Tasmania, 9-13th July 2019

In response to a diverse array of environmental issues such as climate change, resource pollution, energy/water security and food provision, ‘the city’ has been mobilised not only as a site for individual action and behaviour change, but also as a space of policy experimentation and infrastructure renewal amongst other features (cf. Bulkeley & Castan Broto, 2014; Evans et al., 2017). Urban transformations have been explored through a diversity of theoretical and methodological lenses, and typologies are emerging which seek to explain the variety of ways in which urban transitions, and environmental sustainability transformations, are enacted (Caniglia et al., 2017; Caprotti & Cowley, 2017). Such typologies reveal a lack of consideration of lived transformations, or human needs, within accounts of urban transformation and experimentation (Carprotti & Cowley, 2017), and fail to highlight how infrastructural expansion is often legitimated through the construction of ‘urban environmental crises’ (cf. Rogers et al., 2016). There is also a failure to imagine how experiments to deal with widespread environmental change might already exist outside of formal, instigated experimental processes (Davies, 2010), and are instead already housed and enacted within the individual and collective social practices of citizens, communities, and other groups (Head et al., 2016). There are therefore specific challenges regarding how and why transformations are enacted in specific cities, as well as a need to take more seriously the multiple ways that such urban transformations may be enabled, contested or resisted. This is particularly significant in the Asia Pacific, a region experiencing rapid urbanisation with many cities facing environmental challenges and where state-civil society relationships are shifting and fragmented.

This session seeks to reflect on the potential of both established and emerging frameworks to explain processes and patterns of urban environmental transformations in cities across the Asia Pacific region. We seek theoretical and empirical contributions that consider, but are not limited to, the following topics:

·         What are the key environmental challenges that are driving urban transformations in different parts of the Asia Pacific region?

·         How do individual and social practices coalesce with collective action as a response to urban environmental challenges?

·         How are attempts to transform the urban landscape enabled and resisted?

·         What are the moral and ethical issues that underpin urban transformations?

·         What spaces of experimentation exist in Asia Pacific cities that sit outside the boundaries of the ‘formal and instigated’ urban experiment?

·         Where relevant, how do decolonising, (post)colonial, intersectional and feminist lenses facilitate the deeper interrogation of urban environmental transformations in the Asia Pacific?

Please submit abstracts to the IAG conference website https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and also send a copy to Ali Browne (alison.browne@manchester.ac.uk) and Sara Fuller (sara.fuller@mq.edu.au) by the deadline of 28th February 2019.

 
Dr Sara Fuller
Senior Lecturer
Department of Geography and Planning
Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia

T: +61 (2) 9850 8385 | E:  sara.fuller@mq.edu.au  |  W:  mq.edu.au/geoplan

CfP: EcoArts Australis Conference Wollongong May 2019


8th February 2019

CfP: EcoArts Australis Conference Wollongong May 2019

Dear All,

You may be interested in the following conference organised by EcoArts Australis to be held this year at the University of Wollongong 26-28th May – a great opportunity to hear about Environment Arts collaborations.

The theme of this year’s conference is

“Using the visual and performing arts to encourage pro-environmental behaviour”, which might resonate with many in geography.

Information about the conference can be viewed here at the link below, and the call for papers is currently open.

http://www.ecoartsaustralis.org.au/

Regards
Jenny

Dr Jennifer Atchison
Senior Lecturer
Academic Program Director Human Geography Honours
School of Geography and Sustainable Communities | Faculty of Social Science
Office 41.247 | University of Wollongong NSW 2522 Australia
T +61 2 4221 4134 
https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/jenny_atchison

CfP@ ENHR: Comparative studies on redevelopment and social mix through housing


8th February 2019

CfP@ ENHR: Comparative studies on redevelopment and social mix through housing

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract to our session at the 2019 ENHR in Athens. See http://enhr2019.com/workshops-2/

Comparative studies on redevelopment programs for socially mixed communities through housing

This workshop focuses on urban neighbourhoods and local communities. We are interested in the topic of social engineering of social mix policies through housing, from all key stakeholders’ perspectives – government and policy perspectives, service and NGOs perspectives, and residents’ perspectives.

Specific aspects could include social mix as a stated aim or social mix as a by-product of a deconcentrating poverty policy and could include different scales of policies and programs such as the estate, the neighbourhood, metropolitan or national scale. The focus can be on social mix through public housing redevelopment and/or private housing redevelopment.

Plans for the Workshop in Athens

We welcome papers that deal with the policy, design, implementation and lived experience of social mix through housing in different contexts/countries. The premise of the workshop is to explore how this idea of social mix manifests in different cities and neighbourhoods through various policies and programs.

Edited book

We would like to invite contributors in the workshop to participate in an edited book about comparative studies of redevelopment programs for socially mixed communities across the world.

Workshop Coordinators

Dr Iris Levin  ilevin@swin.edu.au
Centre for Urban Transitions, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia

Associate Professor Kathy Arthurson  kathy.arthurson@flinders.edu.au
Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity, Flinders University of SA, Adelaide, Australia

Contact: Dr Iris Levin  ilevin@swin.edu.au

Best wishes,
Iris and Kathy

Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group Sponsored/ Co-sponsored Sessions at the IAG2019, Hobart


8th February 2019

Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group Sponsored/ Co-sponsored Sessions at the IAG2019, Hobart

We are excited that the study group is sponsoring / co-sponsoring three sessions in this conference as well as keynote speaker Greg Lehman (University of Melbourne).

The sessions are:

  1. Justice, Indigeneity and the Settler-Colonial City: Emergence, Divergence and Convergence (Convened by Naama Blatman-Thomas, Francis Markham and Maeve Powell) (Co-sponsored with the Urban Geography study group)
  2. Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis (Convened by Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry)
  3. Developments in Geographies by, for and on behalf of Indigenous peoples (Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)
  4. Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and rights: emerging, diverging and converging research methods and practices (Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)

You can find abstracts for these sessions at the end of this email, as well as at the link here: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

We look forward to seeing your abstracts!
Best wishes,
Sandy Potter and Warrick Fort


Abstracts

1. Justice, Indigeneity and the Settler-Colonial City: Emergence, Divergence and Convergence

(Convened by Naama Blatman-Thomas, Francis Markham and Maeve Powell) (Co-sponsored with the Urban Geography study group)

In this joint session for the Indigenous Peoples Knowledges and Rights and Urban Geography study groups we aim to further contemporary engagements with Indigenous peoples and the settler-colonial city. For too long has urban geography theorised capitalism without colonialism, property without Country, urban politics without Sovereignty and difference without Indigeneity. The effort to end the silence about settler colonialism in urban studies and to centre Indigenous perspectives within the field is well underway. The session is premised on the gambit that understanding the relation between settler colonialism and the urban is a necessary precondition for justice in the settler-colonial city. We aim to further this research agenda, questioning and rethinking the empirical, conceptual and methodological underpinnings of urban geography.

The session seeks contributions that are situated within settler colonial contexts and/or use a settler colonial lens to contribute to contemporary debates around facets of Indigeneity in urban landscapes. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Social segregation, desegregation and encounter;
  • Race, racialisation and whiteness in cities;
  • Commons and prefigurative urban arrangements;
  • Indigenous/non-Indigenous alliances;
  • Decolonisation, Indigenisation and Indigenous visibility;
  • Sovereignty, self-determination, rights, and urban politics;
  • Indigenous people’s knowledge and cities;
  • Urban infrastructures (e.g. public transport, housing, green spaces);
  • Carceral logics, surveillance and control;
  • Racial political economy, ground-rent and land rights;
  • Migration, motion and im/mobilities;
  • Urban Indigenous methodologies

We hope to solicit presenters in this session to submit full papers for a publication in an edited book or a special issue in a leading urban studies journal.

 2Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis

(Convened by Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry)

‘Once upon a time scholars assumed that if you ‘come’ from Latin America you have to ‘talk about’ Latin America; that in such a case you have to be a token of your culture. Such expectation will not arise if the author ‘comes’ from Germany, France, England or the US’

(Walter D Mignolo, 2009)

In this session we ask: If decolonisation is about proliferating planetary imaginaries of being and becoming otherwise, what are the practices we must engage in to decolonise the university. Such a question is crucial when neoliberal pressures and the reproduction of academic practices of privilege have the unintended effect of keeping racial hierarchies intact.  While focusing on the university might render us vulnerable, it is this site of vulnerability that has the capacity to mutate ‘decolonisation’ as more than another academic buzzword. Themes are unlimited but could include:

 Please submit your abstract (150 words) online via the conference website  https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and email the session convenors michele.lobo@deakin.edu.au and  Kaya Barry k.barry@griffith.edu.au with a copy. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 28 February 2019.

3. Developments in Geographies by, for and on behalf of Indigenous peoples

(Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)

This general session, sponsored by the Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group, is focused on developments in geographies by, for and on behalf of Indigenous peoples within Australia and around the globe. We are particularly interested in how spaces and narratives of convergence, emergence and divergence have been and are being navigated to support Indigenous peoples, Country, knowledges and rights.

4. Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and rights: emerging, diverging and converging research methods and practices

(Convened by Sandra Potter and Warrick Fort)

This session, sponsored by the Indigenous Peoples' Knowledges and Rights Study Group, is focused on emerging, diverging and converging research methods and practices which are inspired by or pay respect to Indigenous peoples’ knowledges and rights. We are particularly interested in hearing from postgraduate students and others who are co-producing knowledges with Indigenous peoples in Australia and around the globe. Methods could focus on combining epistemologies, practicing ethical research in Indigenous contexts, and any other such developments in the field.

Legal Geography Study Group is sponsoring three sessions in Hobart 2019:


8th February 2019

Legal Geography Study Group is sponsoring three sessions in Hobart 2019:

We are pleased to announce that the Legal Geography Study Group is sponsoring three sessions in Hobart 2019. We look forward to receiving your abstracts before 28 February via the conference website https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and please email a copy to us Tayanah O’Donnell (tayanah.odonnell@anu.edu.au) and Jo Gillespie (Josephine.gillespie@sydney.edu.au).

Best wishes
Tayanah and Jo
IAG Legal Geography Study Group Convenors

1. Environmental Regulation and the More-than-human
Convenors: Jo Gillespie (USyd), Nicola Perry (USyd) and Tayanah O'Donnell (ANU/RMIT)

More-than-human scholarship is a well-established and rapidly growing focus of inter-disciplinary research. In line with broader aims to re-situate animate, inanimate and complex sets of interactions between non-human and human entities (for example, ecosystems, public spaces etcetera), recent legal geographic scholarship points to increasing recognition of the agency of these ‘more-than-human’ entities (including place) in co-producing situated legal regimes (O’Gorman, 2016, Bartel, 2017). Accounting for these situated legal regimes can shed additional light and space on the more-than-human. This session seeks to stimulate further discussion around the ways in which legal geographic scholarship may contribute to enacting non-universalist environmental regulation that better accounts for and recognises the agencies (and rights) of non-human entities from conception to realisation. We seek to draw out the tension between the goals of environmental law as controlling human behaviour to achieve specific outcomes on the one-hand, as contrasted with the unruliness, alternative agency and ‘wildness’ of the more-than-human world. For example, what happens when species move outside of protected area boundaries in response to changing climatic conditions? How might the way in which biodiversity law frequently seeks to protect lists of individual species conflict with theorising around multispecies justice? How does recognising non-human agency impact questions around what environmental law ‘should’ seek to preserve/restore? Braverman’s ‘Lively Legalities’ work additionally provides a useful springboard for extended consideration of the ethical dimensions of ‘regulating life’, in which she explores “…what, in legal terms, it means to be human and nonhuman, what it means to govern and to be governed, and what are the ethical and political concerns that emerge from the project of governing human as well as more-than-human life.” (Braverman, 2016, p.3). 

This session will invite contributions which address the theme of the interplay between environmental regulation and the more-than-human.

Refs: Bartel, R. (2017). Place-speaking: Attending to the relational, material and governance messages of Silent Spring. Geographical Journal, 184(1), 64–74; Braverman, I, (2016), Animals, Biopolitics, Law: Lively Legalities, Routledge, Abingdon and New York; O’Gorman, E. (2016). The pelican slaughter of 1911: A history of competing values, killing and private property from the Coorong, South Australia. Geographical Research, 54(3), 285–300.

2. Geographies of Conflict: Law, Legalism and (Il)Legality
Convenor: Brad Jessup (UMelb)

This session emanates from and builds upon the Legal Geography Study group symposium held in February 2019 on the theme 'Sites of Justice and Injustice'. The papers in this session will address a conflict over time(s), place(s) or scale(s), drawing in matters, intersections or absences of law and geography.

3. Material laws, material worlds: converging potential as between political ecology and legal geography
Convenors: Tayanah O'Donnell (ANU/RMIT) and Jo Gillespie (USyd)

This session springs from an emergent literature which explicitly engages with the linkages or otherwise between political ecology and legal geography (e.g. Andrews and McCarthy 2014 and Salgo and Gillespie 2018). Political ecologists have long been engaged in exposing different forms of power dynamics in environmental settings to aid decision-making in environmental policy. Legal geographers are interested in exposing these power dynamics (Blomley 1994; O’Donnell 2016) in their quest to better explore and understand the relationships between space, place, and law. Linking these distinctive fields opens a deep crevasse through which scholars can centre materiality. There are important reasons to do so, beyond the theoretical. Policy and practice are demanding better understanding of the role of law in responding to environmental change. Equally, a rapidly changing material world gives to law new and ever-changing challenges. Our provocations for this session are: can disciplinary convergence dilute the potential of interdisciplinary endeavours? How does law interact with the political-social in shaping place, and in what ways is environmental and climatic change influencing this dynamic?

Refs: 
Andrews, E. and McCarthy, J., (2014) Scale, Shale, and the State: Political Ecologies and Legal Geographies of Shale gas Development in Pennsylvania, Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 4:1, pp. 7–16; Blomley, N., (1994) Law, Space, and the Geographies of Power (The Guilford Press, London); O’Donnell, T., (2016) Legal geography and coastal climate change adaptation: The Vaughan litigation, Geographical Research 54:3, pp. 301-312; Salgo, M. and Gillespie, J., (2018) Cracking the Code: A legal geography and political ecological perspective on vegetation clearing regulations, Australian Geographer, 49:4, pp. 483 – 496.

Dr Josephine Gillespie
School of Geosciences
The University of Sydney
http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/josephine.gillespie.php

2nd CFP: Royal Geographical Society Conference (with IBG), Imperial College London, 27-30 August 2019


7th February 2019

2nd CFP: Royal Geographical Society Conference (with IBG), Imperial College London, 27-30 August 2019

Session title: Rural to where? Rural young people’s geographies in mobility, learning, trajectories and hopefulness

Session organisers: 

Assoc. Prof. Tracey Skelton [geost@nus.edu.sg]
Jessica Clendenning [Jessica.clendenning@u.nus.edu]
Geography, National University of Singapore

Co-sponsoring groups:  1) Geographies of Children, Youth & Families Research Group (CYFRG); 2) Developing Areas Research Group (DARG)

Globally, rural young people, compared to their urban counterparts, are relatively understudied and/or misunderstood in academic discourse and policy debates (Panelli et al. 2007; Jeffrey 2008; Punch 2015). These trends, however, may be shifting as some major development organisations focus on ‘youth’, and examine rural development and gender dynamics more closely (e.g., CTA and IFAD 2014; UNESCO 2016; UN Women 2017; FAO 2018).  This session builds upon both ‘troubled’ and ‘hopeful’ foci in policy and academic studies on rural youth transitions and mobility (e.g., Chant and Jones 2005; Crivello 2010; Punch and Sugden 2013; Cuervo and Wynn 2014; Farrugia 2016; Woronov 2016; Chea and Huijsmans 2018) to understand rural young people’s educational pathways for navigating opportunities, challenges and precarity. The session examines details about how these pathways affect localised and informal learning (e.g., Katz 2004), and the choices and alternatives young people have in education, training, and making a living.

This session explores how rural youth (including those in small towns) use and access various forms of mobility, education or training (e.g. vocational, technical, formal) to improve their skills for work, self-employment, further migration, etc., and the outcomes or consequences of such investments. Questions for analysis may include:

  • What are rural young people’s pathways for education and training, and where do they lead? 
  • What are the formal or informal skills rural young people acquire from these pathways; how are they used in their everyday lives to find work?
  • What are the effects of these investments in mobility, education and training on their families, natal villages, land uses and forests?
  • What are the negative and positive effects of rural youthful mobilities? For example, problems of debt or acquisition of cultural capital. What might be the short-term or long-term impacts?
  • How does ‘home place’, along with other social factors such as gender, ethnicity and age, affect their in/ability to become mobile, access education or employment resources?
  • What are the spatialities of where schools/training centres are based, subject areas, and types of student populations (e.g., vocational or tertiary; rural or urban)? What is learned, gained and un/successful?
  • How do differing types of migration (distance, time, type of work) affect connections to families, villages, labour and knowledge in natal land?
  • Why do young people return to rural areas?
  • What implications does this have for rural areas, rural development and rural young people’s futures?

The aim of this session is to address topics relating to young people’s current trajectories in rural areas.  We anticipate diverse research and discussions that center on rural youth’s hopes and troubles, obstacles and opportunities, that they must navigate in a wide variety of contexts and countries.  We look forward to discussing new methodologies and perspectives, and invite scholars from all academic (and non-academic) fields, including (but not limited to) human geography, political ecology, environmental sociology, anthropology, gender and women’s studies, youth studies, etc.

Interested participants should email: their names, affiliations, email addresses, paper titles and abstracts (250 words) to both Tracey Skelton (geost@nus.edu.sgand Jessica Clendenning (Jessica.clendenning@u.nus.edu) by Tuesday, February 12th.  We look forward to meeting you in London!

Meg Sherval (The University of Newcastle) on behalf of Tracey Skelton (National University of Singapore).

Women and Leadership Australia leadership development program funding


7th February 2019

Women & Leadership Australia leadership development program funding

Funding of up to $7,000 for sciences sector women available

Building on the success of last year’s ‘100 Days for Change’ campaign, Women & Leadership Australia is administering an initiative to support the development of female leaders across Australia’s sciences sector. 

Women & Leadership Australia leadership development program funding

The campaign is providing women with grants of between $3,000 and $7,000 to enable participation in a range of leadership development programs. 

The scholarship funding is provided with the specific intent of providing powerful and effective development opportunities for sciences sector women; however the funding is strictly limited and has to be allocated prior to the end of March.

Expressions of Interest 
Find out more and register your interest by completing the Expression of Interest form here prior to Friday, March 15: www.wla.edu.au/register 

CfP IAG2019: Housing and home: Assembling geographies of emergence, divergence, and convergence


30th January 2019

CFP iAG2019: Housing and home: Assembling geographies of emergence, divergence, and convergence

Session Title: Housing and home: Assembling geographies of emergence, divergence, and convergence
Institute of Australian Geographer’s Annual Conference
, Hobart, Tasmania, 9-13 July 2019
Session Organisers: Tegan Bergan, Rae Dufty-Jones, Sophie-May Kerr, Kathy Mee, and Emma Power

In 2019 how Australians are housed and make home continues to be as important as ever. Issues range from questions of affordability, market ‘bubbles’, equity (spatial, social, environmental and integenerational), homelessness, design, demography, mobility, financialisation, precarity, etc. From this context new challenges and possibilities emerge making home spaces -- both literally and figuratively – important sites in how the hopes, fears and aspirations of individuals, communities and the nation-state emerge, diverge and converge. We invite papers in this session that explore the assembling of geographies of housing and home at a range of scales and through a variety of (sub)disciplinary perspectives.

We welcome abstracts responding to the above call for papers. Please submit abstracts of 150 words to the conference website (https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts) and email a copy to the session organisers Tegan Bergan T.Bergan@westernsydney.edu.au, Sophie May-Kerr smk534@uowmail.edu.au and Kathy Mee kathy.mee@newcastle.edu.au.

Submission of abstracts closes 28 February 2019.

Cheers, Tegan, Sophie-May, Rae, Emma and Kathy

Cultural Geography Study Group Sessions and Events


30th January 2019

Dear Friends

Best wishes for the New Year. We are delighted to sponsor 14 sessions at IAG Hobart and look forward to your abstracts by 28 February 2019. Please upload abstracts at https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts. Details of sessions, April 2019 event and pre-conference film workshop below. Thanks Sessions organisers!

CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY STUDY GROUP SESSIONS AND EVENTS

April 2019 - Liminal Zones: Where sea and land meet, Newcastle University. Look out for more details of this workshop sponsored by the Institute of Australian Geographers. Send your ideas tooWe thank the Critical Development (Lead Convenor: Fiona Miller) and Nature, Risk and Resilience Study Group (Lead Convenor: Lauren Rickards and colleagues) for their support. The event is the second stage in a 3-yr program that focuses on collaborative and creative responses to environmental change in the Anthropocene. Builds on Oceanic Responsibilities and Co-belonging  https://oceanicresponsibilities.wordpress.com/. (Deakin University, February 2018)

9th July 2019 - IAG Pre-conference documentary film-making workshop. Distinguished film maker Molly Reynolds (https://2017.perthfestival.com.au/piaf-connect/whats-on/events/masterclass-filmmakers-molly-reynolds-and-rolf-de-heer/. Send us your suggestions.

IAG SESSIONS

  1. New and Emerging Research in Cultural Geography (Michele Lobo, Michelle Duffy, Vickie Zhang)
  2. Mobilising colours in geographical research: vibrancies, saturations, and more-than-visual methods (Diti Bhattacharya, Tim Edensor, Kaya Barry)
  3. #Metoo: Exploring everyday negotiations of gender, space and place (Ainsley Hughes)
  4. Food Possibilities (Fanqi Liu, Ilan Wiesel, Lesley Head)
  5. Research assemblages: thinking through the production of research (Susannah Clement)
  6. From Ship to Shore: a cultural geography of seafarers (Uma Kothari and Maria Borovnik)
  7. ’Abundant futures’: The ethico-political potential of thinking with race (Michele Lobo, Ashraful Alam, Donna Houston and Andrew Burridge)
  8. Sport Geographies (Adele Pavlidis and Jora Broerse)
  9. Granular Geographies: sensing the materiality of stone, sand and soil (Uma Kothari and Vanessa Lamb)
  10. The Unconscious and Emerging Behaviour (Scott Sharpe and the Difference Lab)
  11. Thinking Intersectionality in Critical Feminist Development Studies (Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt)
  12. Animal urban geographies of the Global South: Making spaces for, with and by non-humans (Yamini Narayanan and Ashraful Alam)
  13. Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis (Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry)
  14. "If the trees spoke….Sound art, 2019, Binaural and Podcast Recordings of Voice and City Environments(Candice P. Boyd)

Kind Regards
Michele Lobo, Michelle Lobo, Vickie Zhang
(IAG Cultural Geog Study Group Convenors)

CfP IAG2019: Critical Development Study Group Sessions


29th January 2019

IAG Critical Development Study Group Sessions

Call for papers are now open for the IAG’s Annual Conference in Hobart from 9-13 July 2019! Please consider submitting an abstract to one of the sessions (co-)sponsored by the IAG Critical Development Study Group. Further details about how to submit your abstract are available at: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

Kind regards,
Fiona Miller, Sarah Wright and Andrew Deuchar

------------

Geographies of Energy Access, Poverty, and Justice

Session convenor: Jonathan Balls (University Of Melbourne)

This session will focus on new geographies of energy access, poverty, and justice in places where energy access initiatives and renewable energy transitions are changing energy landscapes. A rich body of geographical work considers energy poverty and justice (Munro et al., 2017; Yenneti et al. 2016; Castán Broto et al., 2018; Salazar and Adams, 2014) as well as energy transitions and the spread of renewables (Power et al., 2016). This session will include theoretical and empirical contributions that build on this work and take forward geographical theory in these fields.

Geographies of participation: practices, publics, power, and politics

Session convenors: Brian Cook (The University Of Melbourne), Matthew Kearnes (UNSW), Tim Neale (Deakin University), and Noel Castree (The University of Manchester)

Co-sponsored by the Critical Development and Nature, Risk & Resilience Study Groups

Publics are made. They emerge when researchers, practitioners, and innumerable factors come together with purpose. Like the societies from which they emerge, publics are not necessarily ‘good’ or ‘progressive’, and even when purportedly altruistic there are always power hierarchies that exclude and advantage some publics over other publics (Chilvers & Kearnes, 2016). There are winners and there are losers, and the aspiration of ‘win-win’, while noble, is rarely realised. What then of the long sought-after promise of participation?


In general, the turn towards participation has prompted significant and effective critique of existing knowledge-power and associated practices. The discourse has also criticised itself, attacking technocratic versions of participation that focus on methods and techniques designed to realise expert- or elite-determined objectives (Chilvers & Kearnes, in review). Critics of participation have also demonstrated how economic calculations impose boundaries that protect existing practices (Lane, Landström, & Whatmore, 2011), while others have shown that an emphasis on technologies and ‘apps’ more often entrench existing power than challenge it (Swyngedouw, 2005). Despite its many faults and compelling critiques, participation remains a promising and tantalisingly-close alternative to prevailing practices. Furthermore, the emergence and entrenchment of populism and post-truth politics mean that opportunities for collaboration are especially important. 

The proposed session(s) and panel on the geographies of participation call for researchers (and others) who remain optimistic. We propose an opportunity for those working in the context of participation to, themselves, converge with the aim of presenting and debating a renewed promise of participation. Contributions are sought from across the geographical discipline from those using and analysing participation, including theoretical, methodological, and case-based contributions. We are seeking presentations that explore the practices and pathways that can be built upon, especially those that combine reconceptualisations that advance the promise of participation or that challenge prevailing practices (Cook & Overpeck, accepted). We envision those drawing upon citizen science, citizen juries, theories of ‘opening/closing’ and/or ‘upstream/downstream’ conceptualisations, but are open to all who associate with participation.

In addition to standard paper presentations, we will attempt to produce a commentary for The Conversation that explores the lingering promise of participation in the context of emerging populism, nationalism, the (purported) polarisation of society, increased inequality, and democracy. If there is interest, we will also develop a proposal for a special issue.

Granular Geographies: sensing the materiality of stone, sand and soil

Uma Kothari and Vanessa Lamb (University of Melbourne)

Co-sponsored by the Critical Development and Cultural Geography Study Groups

Stone, sand and soil are composed of small grains, yet we rarely think of their singularity, instead focusing on the discrete objects that they collectively constitute. In this session, we explore the sensory, affective and productive capacities of these substances, and seek to better conceptualize how these granular entities are integral to the material world. We aim to investigate how their excavation, accumulation and circulation produces human and non-human entanglements, and connects people and places to create granular geographies. We also examine how political tensions around these processes are intensifying, their growing demand and scarcity impacting upon construction projects.

 

Thinking Intersectionality in Critical Feminist Development Studies

Session convenor: Kuntala Lahiri-dutt (The Australian National University)

Co-sponsored by the Critical Development and Cultural Geography Study Groups

This session invites short presentations that discuss the complex challenges arising from the possibilities to translate feminist theoretical insights into one or more analytical frameworks for applied use to carry out gender analysis for development projects.

‘Intersectionality’ implies ‘the interaction between gender, race, and other categories of difference in individual lives, social practices, institutional arrangements, and cultural ideologies and the outcomes of these interactions in terms of power’ (Davis 2008, p. 68). It offers an analytical framework to consider the interconnections among various forms of social stratification, such as class, race, sexual orientation, age, religion, creed, disability and gender to understand the ways they combine to create disadvantages for women (hooks 2000). Intersectionality has been described as a ‘The greatest contribution [of feminist theorists] to social science as a whole’ (Belkhir, 2009:3), yet others consider it as a ‘buzzword’ that is conceptually meaningful, yet extremely difficult to apply in measurable ways (May 2015). Yet, such is the popularity of the term that it has become, arguably, the new theoretical darling for feminists; a growing body of gender studies literature in developing country contexts attempts to break the prevalent sex-based binary to marry feminist theories with GAD practices. 
In this context, the session aims to query: is it at all possible to develop a gender analytical framework that is based on the concept of intersectionality? Could such efforts ultimately depolicise feminist insights? How does one detach themselves from the culture of indicators and quantitative metrices in applying the concept of intersectionality in their GAD work? How can such a framework be possibly applied by gender professionals and at what scales? Finally, what could  be the political implications for turning an advanced conceptualisation of gender identities into a replicable and measurable analytical tool? 
Additional questions addressed or challenges analysed are welcomed.

 

Co-producing Critical Development Geographies

Session convenors: Fiona Miller (Macquarie University), Sarah Wright (University of Newcastle), Andrew Deuchar (University of Melbourne)

This session invites papers that address contemporary themes in critical development geography through the lens of co-production recognising that critical development research is constantly subject to negotiation, interpretation and theorisation.  Critical development geography research is shaped by the relations researchers have with peers, supervisors, scholars, partners, places and non-humans in particular places and cultures at particular times. These relations are contextual, subjective, emotional and political. We welcome papers that engage critically with what it means to do development research, engaging with the ethics, politics and emotions associated with working in cross-cultural contexts.

How does the tension between hopeful and critical perspectives on development constrain or enable particular understandings and approaches to development? How are different knowledges and perspectives negotiated and mediated?

Papers may include topics such as:

  • Emancipatory methodologies in and pedagogies of development
  • Indigenous-led geographies of development
  • Affect and emotions as post-development practice
  • Development policies and interventions
  • Migration, displacement and development
  • The Sustainable Development Goals
  • Gender dimensions and development
  • Activism and development
  • Marginality, exclusion, empowerment and development
  • Justice and development
  • Hopeful and strengths-based approaches in development

-- 

Dr Fiona Miller
Senior Lecturer
Department of Geography and Planning  
Faculty of Arts  |  Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia  
T: +61 2 9850 8425  |  F: +61 2 9850 6052   |  
E: fiona.miller@mq.edu.au  |  mq.edu.au

CfP IAG2019: Energy Geographies


29th January 2019

CFP IAG2019: Energy Geographies

Call for Papers:
Institute of Australian Geographers
Hobart, July 9-13, 2019

"Energy Geographies"
Organisers:
Heather Lovell (University of Tasmania)
Andrew Harwood (University of Tasmania)

The energy sector is experiencing a period of rapid change, with intensification of academic and policy debates regarding energy security, climate change and affordability. This session seeks papers on a broad range of topics to do with the geographical study of energy, ranging from household energy studies and off-grid communities to city energy flows and resource geographies.  We are interested in papers that challenge technological approaches to understanding energy, either theoretically or empirically. 

To submit to our session, please submit your paper title and abstract through the IAG conference website, where you will find an option to select ‘Energy Geographies’ (deadline 28th February 2019). In addition, please email your paper title and abstract to Heather Lovell heather.lovell@utas.edu.au and Andrew Harwood andrew.harwood@utas.edu.au.

Kind regards
Heather and Andrew

Professor Heather Lovell, Associate Head-Research & Interdisciplinary Research Lead
School of Technology, Environments & Design,
University of Tasmania; Room 423, Geography & Spatial Sciences

tel: +61 3 6226 7243; +61 (0)474 849084

UTAS Profile Page

CfP IAG2019: The Unconscious and Emerging Behaviour


29th January 2019

CFP 2019 IAG Hobart 9-13th July - The Unconscious and Emerging Behaviour

The Unconscious and Emerging Behaviour (Sponsored by the Cultural Geography Study Group)

Organisers: The Difference Lab

The unconscious has become a key territory for thinking through the new science of behaviour where this science is fast being pluralized to include questions around the aesthetics, architectures and ethics transforming the governance of individuals and the meaning of being human. Recent human geographical work on affect, embodiment, performance, materiality, and habit has highlighted the discipline’s contribution to scholarship on the unconscious. This session aims to showcase the latest thinking on geography’s engagement with the unconscious that extends well beyond the interiority of the sovereign subject. Possible topics include the unconscious and: empiricism; technology; politics; performance; aesthetics; ethics.

Please send your 150 word abstract to https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts by 28th February, 2019 and please choose ‘The Unconscious and Emerging Behaviour’ from the sessions list.

Please also send a copy to J-D Dewsbury JD.Dewsbury@adfa.edu.au and Scott Sharpe, S.Sharpe@adfa.edu.au.

Dr Scott Sharpe
Deputy Head of School (Education) | School of Physical, Environmental & Mathematical Sciences|
UNSW at Canberra| Canberra ACT 2600| Australia|Tel: +61 2 62686296|Mob: +61431546097

Second CFP – Housing Theory Symposium - Housing In/formality, Sydney 30-31 May 2019


29th January 2019

Second CFP – Housing Theory Symposium "Housing In/formality", Sydney 30-31 May 2019

We would like to invite abstracts to the following CFP for the Housing Theory Symposium 2019, to be held at the University of Sydney. We also advise that papers accepted for the symposium will have the opportunity to submit to a special issue on “Informal Housing Practices” in the International Journal of Housing Policy, edited by Prof Nicole Gurran, Dr Pranita Shrestha, and Dr Sophia Maalsen.

Housing In/formality
Housing Theory Symposium 2019
May 30-31st 2019, The University of Sydney

Housing emerges through the intersection of formal and informal processes. Traditionally, housing and urban informality has been associated with the Global South, but an emerging body of literature is looking at how informality materializes in the North. Who decides what and where is in/formal? How do different groups experience the effects of in/formality? Roy (2005) positions informality as a political construct and highlights the power of the state in defining informality, but there is a larger suite of actors involved in defining, making, and living with in/formality, including local residents and corporations.

In this symposium, we invite papers that problematize and unpack what “informal” means for housing through theoretical and empirical analysis. Papers could address the following topics, although this is not an exhaustive list:

  • The dialectic between formality and informality
  • Is in/formality worth pursuing?
  • How is in/formality constructed?
  • What actors define in/formality?
  • What are the opportunities and restrictions of in/formality?
  • How is in/formality in housing experienced?
  • What theoretical contributions can a focus on housing provide to the debate on in/formality?

We invite abstracts of no more than 300 words to be submitted by February 18th 2019. Authors will be notified of the outcome of their submissions by March 1st 2019.

Please submit papers to Sophia Maalsen (Sophia.maalsen@sydney.edu.au) and Jathan Sadowski (jathan.sadowski@sydney.edu.au).

Kind regards
Sophia and Jathan                   

Dr. Jathan Sadowski | Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Smart Cities
School of Architecture, Design and Planning | The University of Sydney

Call for Abstracts IAG2019: Experiments in Green Finance


28th January 2019

Call for Abstracts: Experiments in Green Finance, IAG 2019 Hobart

Session Convenors: Dr Svenja Keele (University of Melbourne) and Dr Tom Baker (University of Auckland)

Experiments in ‘green finance’ are proliferating worldwide. From emissions trading schemes to catastrophe bonds, biodiversity offsets to payments for ecosystem services, green finance experiments attempt to redirect circuits of capital towards more socially and environmentally sustainable ends. Underpinned by new systems of abstraction and commensuration, and mediated by new technologies, these experiments are reconfiguring relations between government, business, communities and nature itself. Green financial instruments are gaining new impetus under the ‘Green Economy’, a (re-)emergent discourse promoting the use of technocratic rationalities and market-based mechanisms to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation and stimulate supposed win-win solutions to financial and ecological crises.

In response to ongoing green financial experimentation, geographers have started to examine how ‘green’ markets are brought into being (Berndt & Boeckler 2011, McAfee 2016, Bracking 2015, Knox-Hayes 2016), the ‘spatial mechanics’ of production and consumption associated with ‘green consumerism’ (Caprotti and Bailey 2014), how financial value is produced through the commodification of uncertain futures (Christophers 2018) and the proliferating ways in which nature is remade as a site for profitable enterprise (Castree & Christophers 2015, Sullivan 2013).  At the same time, the geographic literature includes accounts of where the commodification and financialisation of nature has failed (Dempsey 2014), the potential for green finance to achieve transformative and just outcomes (Ehresman & Okereke 2015, Ferguson 2015) and where communities have resisted or appropriated tools and ideas of the Green Economy to secure other benefits (Jackson and Palmer 2015).

This session seeks to extend the conversation by inviting papers examining the practices, outcomes and implications of green finance experiments. Recognising the plurality of approaches engaging with this issue, we invite contributions from economic, political, urban and cultural geographers. We welcome papers from postgraduate students.

Please email presentation titles and 250-word abstracts addressing the session’s themes to svenja.keele@unimelb.edu.au and t.baker@auckland.ac.nz by Tuesday 26 February 2019.

Berndt C & Boeckler M (2011) Geographies of markets: Materials, morals and monsters in motion. Progress in Human Geography 35, 559–567.

Bracking S (2015) Performativity in the Green Economy: how far does climate finance create a fictive economy? Third World Quarterly 36:2337-2357.

Caprotti F & Bailey I (2014) Making sense of the green economy. Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography 96:195-200.

Castree N & Christophers B (2015) Banking spatially on the future: Capital switching, infrastructure, and the ecological fix. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 105:378-386.

Christophers B (2018) Risking value theory in the political economy of finance and nature, Progress in Human Geography 42(3):330-349

Dempsey J (2016) Enterprising nature: Economics, markets, and finance in global biodiversity politics. Chichester, West Sussex, England : Wiley-Blackwell

Ehresman T G & Okereke O (2015) Environmental justice and conceptions of the green economy, International Environmental Agreements, 15:13-27

Ferguson P (2015) The green economy agenda: business as usual or transformational discourse? Environmental Politics 24:17-37

Jackson S & Palmer LR (2015) Reconceptualizing ecosystem services: Possibilities for cultivating and valuing the ethics and practices of care. Progress in Human Geography 39(2):122-145

Knox-Hayes JK (2016) The cultures of markets : the political economy of climate governance, Oxford : Oxford University Press

McAfee K (2016) Green economy and carbon markets for conservation and development: a critical view, International Environmental Agreements 16:333-353

Sullivan S (2013) Banking nature? The spectacular financialisation of environmental conservation. Antipode 45(1):198-217

Dr Svenja Keele | Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Resilient Cities
Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute | Melbourne School of Design
Level 3, Building 133, Masson Road
The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia

T: +61 3 8344 2812 E: svenja.keele@unimelb.edu.au W: sustainable.unimelb.edu.au

CfP IAG2019: Australia’s Political-Economic Futures: Towards or Against Convergence?, IAG 2019 Hobart


28th January 2019

CFP: Australia’s Political-Economic Futures: Towards or Against Convergence?, IAG 2019 Hobart

Organisers:
Sangeetha Chandrashekeran (The University of Melbourne)

Sally Weller (ACU)
Brendan Gleeson (University of Melbourne)

This session engages critically with the conference theme by probing and problematising the idea of convergence in today’s Australian political economy.

Australia provides an ideal site for testing claims that globalising forces lead ineluctably towards the convergence of regional growth paths. Australian economic geography has had much to say about the globalisation of the national economy in the 1980s and 1990s (Fagan and Webber 1994) and more recently geographical analyses of structural changes in Australia’s agriculture, automotive, creative industries, energy, and financial sectors have shed new light on the implications for the spatial organisation of major cities and regions (Globalising the Australian Economy 2018; O’Hanlon 2018). These studies reveal the globally-oriented policies of the political state: the rise of the services sector, underpinned by the deep financialisaton of the economy, and the reciprocal stagnation or decline of sectors, places and communities that were once central to Australia’s political and economic identity.

Today, Australia’s national economy is characterised by marked differences between an urban core, metropolitan areas and regional peripheries as an old economy based on natural resource dependence coexists uneasily with a new services economy. This is accompanied by high levels of international ownership, labour market casualisation, wage stagnation, ineffective regulation, rampant growth in executive pay; diminished social service provision; and the erosion of support for key local cultural economic institutions and practices. Addressing the twin challenges of rapid decarbonisation and a crisis of affordability in essential service markets (such as housing and energy) is hampered by political paralysis in the context of growing demands on services, changing demographics, and a shrinking corporate tax base.

Given this context we ask ‘where to from here’ for the Australian political economy and what are the prospects for convergence of any sort? This session seeks critical perspectives that deepen our understanding of the political-economic context. This session is interested in analyses that examine the notion of convergence through a critical geographical frame, that contest and reframe the idea of convergence or that explore alternatives, such as divergence and emergence. We welcome papers in the heterodox economic geography tradition, assessing the reshaped economic landscape, and exploring the variety of possible futures that speak to the prospects of convergence. We seek papers probing the scaled sectoral or regional interactions among economic, social, political, cultural and environmental objectives and processes.

Please send your paper title and abstract to Sangeetha Chandrashekeran (sangeetha.chandra@unimelb.edu.au ) and Sally Weller (sally.weller@acu.edu.au) by 26 February 2019.

Fagan, R.H. and Webber, M.J., 1994. Global restructuring: the Australian experience. Oxford University Press, USA.

Globalising the Australian Economy Australian Geographer Volume 49, 2018 - Issue 3

O’Hanlon, S. 2018. City life: the new urban Australia NewSouth Publishing.

Dr Sangeetha Chandrashekeran 
Deputy Director | Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute | Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning
Lecturer and Researcher | School of Geography  |  Faculty of Science

T: +61 3 8344 2661  M: 0418 329 689  E: sangeetha.chandra@unimelb.edu.au   

CfP IAG2019: Sport geographies


28th January 2019

CfP: Sport geographies, IAG 2019 Hobart

We invite submissions of abstracts to the call for papers below to be held at the 2019 Institute of Australian Geographers Conference (Hobart, Tasmania, July  9 to 13).

Session organisers: Adele Pavlidis and Jora Broerse
(
Sponsored by the Cultural Geography Study Group)

Sport in Australia is intimately tied up with notions of pride, nationhood, and masculinity. As a field of study, sport geography is a site of emerging theories and concepts, diverging and converging with urban, social, cultural, emotional, economic, land-use, health and other geographies. From change rooms, to board rooms, sporting fields to dance halls, enfleshed bodies to digital sites, sport happens somewhere. This session calls for papers that explore the spatiality of sport, broadly defined to include team sports, individual pursuits and active leisure

Abstracts are due 28th February via the following link (you will create an account and then go on to submit your abstract, choosing 'Sport Geographies' in the drop down box) https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

If you have any questions at all or comments, please do not hesitate to email either of us, Adele Pavlidis a.pavlidis@griffith.edu.au and Jora Broese jozefien.broerse@live.vu.edu.au

CfP IAG2019: ‘Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence’


28th January 2019

CFP: ‘Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence’, IAG 2019 Hobart

Session Title: Granular Geographies: sensing the materiality of stone, sand and soil

Sponsored by: the IAG Cultural Geography and the Critical Development Study Groups

Convenors: Uma Kothari (University of Manchester and University of Melbourne) and Vanessa Lamb (University of Melbourne)

Stone, sand and soil are composed of small grains, yet we rarely think of their singularity, instead focusing on the discrete objects that they collectively constitute. In this session, we explore the sensory, affective and productive capacities of these substances, and seek to better conceptualize how these granular entities are integral to the material world. We aim to investigate how their excavation, accumulation and circulation produces human and non-human entanglements, and connects people and places to create granular geographies. We also examine how political tensions around these processes are intensifying with their growing demand and scarcity.

Please submit your abstracts (150 words) online via the conference website  https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts  and email the session convenors uma.kothari@manchester.ac.uk and vanessa.lamb@unimelb.edu.au. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 28 February 2019.

Best wishes
Uma Kothari and Vanessa Lamb

Vanessa Lamb | Lecturer, School of Geography
Level 2 (Rm 2.35), 221 Bouverie Street
he University of Melbourne, Victoria 3053 Australia

T: +61 3 90358974  E: vanessa.lamb@unimelb.edu.au
W: vanessalamb.org and Unimelb Expert Page

CfP IAG2019:“Disruption, transformation and innovation in the peripheries”


28th January 2019

CFP:“Disruption, transformation and innovation in the peripheries”, IAG 2019 Hobart

Organisers:
Kirsten Martinus (The University of Western Australia)

Phillip O’Neill (Western Sydney University)

Economic geography has long been concerned with the distribution of resources and emanating geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence. Defined broadly, convergence or globalising forces move towards some equilibrium; divergence or localising forces generate persistent differences; and emergence is the creation of new growth paths. As such, the three concepts are widely drawn on to explain various phenomena in economic geography, implying the existence of a core and a periphery as either a location or actor position. For example, regional development theories apply them to explain the persistent uneven development and spatial processes occurring between an urban core and its outer metropolitan or regional peripheries. Evolutionary economics uses them to describe industry paths of new growth, stagnation or decline – such as when differentiated or related knowledge bases are combined. Yet again, political economy discourse employs them to understand how social values (re)shape sustainable outcomes to generate new opportunities and markets.

Nonetheless, whilst the concepts of emergence, divergence and divergence have led to significant theoretical advances in understanding of various processes associated with climate change, the economy, society and politics, there continues to be widening inequality and (dis)advantage between and within all spatial levels. Recent research has found binary notions of the Global North/South, developing/developed (and so on), no longer to hold true – with inequality becoming greater within nations than between them. Some have suggested that part of the issue has been an over-focus on the locational or positional core in research, funding and policies, and do not take into account or understand the unique attribute or dynamics of processes in the peripheries. Research has found that this has led to the unintended consequences of exacerbating core-periphery inequalities, compounding issues of system divergence rather than convergence.

As a result, some scholars now argue that peripheries must be understood as distinct ‘spaces’ in their own right. This call for papers focuses on generating a special session to understanding how disruption, transformation and innovation in peripheries (a location or an actor position) are altering previous processes of emergence, divergence and convergence.

We welcome papers related, but not limited, to the following questions on a variety of subject matters (e.g. social, political, spatial, economic, environmental):

·   Is there an emergence of new models or actors disrupting traditional systems of practice and ‘ways of knowing’? Examples include green finance, and the sharing economy.

·  How are alternative or indigenous knowledges transforming the futures of ‘peripheries’?

·   What and how are innovations creating a more equal playing field between peripheries and core areas (i.e. convergence in a given spatial system)? What are the dynamics or processes facilitating this? Examples include use of drone or sensory technologies, artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, or other applications.

·   How does knowledge and innovation thrive differently in peripheries compared to the economic core?

·  How should policy mechanisms be changed to better support convergence between the core and the periphery?

To submit to our session, please submit your paper title and abstract through the IAG conference website by selecting our session (deadline 28th February 2019). In addition, please send your paper title and abstract to Kirsten Martinus (kirsten.martinus@uwa.edu.au ) and Phillip O’Neill (P.ONeill@westernsydney.edu.au ).

Dr Kirsten Martinus
Senior Research Fellow

Centre for Regional Development, School of Agriculture and Environment  •  M000, Perth WA 6009 Australia

+61 8 6488 7674  •  +61 431 435 602  •  kirsten.martinus@uwa.edu.au

Second call: ‘New Urban Natures: Volatile Worlds’  A Geographical Society of New South Wales (GSNSW) Symposium


28th January 2019

Second call:
‘New Urban Natures: Volatile Worlds’ 
A Geographical Society of New South Wales (GSNSW) Symposium

With keynote by Harriet Bulkeley (Durham University)
Friday, 22 February 2019
University of Wollongong

We invite you to a day of discussion, led by our panellist-provocateurs:

Aidan Davison (UTas), Nicole Cook (UOW), Ben Cooke (RMIT), Donna Houston (Macq), Ryan Jones (Newc), Dave Kendal (UTas), Cecily Maller (RMIT), Catherine Phillips (Melb), Libby Porter (RMIT)

Convenors:  Leah Gibbs, Pauline McGuirk, Jennifer Atchison, Chantel Carr

Further details: UOW ACCESS events

Extended registration: by Monday, 4 February 2019 

Dr Leah Gibbs
School of Geography and Sustainable Communities | Faculty of Social Sciences
University of Wollongong NSW 2522 Australia

T +61 2 4298 1547
https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/leah_gibbs

CfP RGSC with IBG: Rural to where? Rural young people’s geographies in mobility, learning, trajectories and hopefulness, Royal Geographical Society Conference (with IBG)


23rd January 2019

CFP: Rural to where? Rural young people’s geographies in mobility, learning, trajectories and hopefulness, Royal Geographical Society Conference (with IBG)

Session title: Rural to where? Rural young people’s geographies in mobility, learning, trajectories and hopefulness

Royal Geographical Society Conference (with IBG), Imperial College London, 27-30 August 2019

Session organisers:

Assoc. Prof. Tracey Skelton [geost@nus.edu.sg]

Jessica Clendenning [Jessica.clendenning@u.nus.edu]        

Geography, National University of Singapore

Co-sponsoring groups:

1) Geographies of Children, Youth & Families Research Group (CYFRG);  2) Developing Areas Research Group (DARG)

Globally, rural young people, compared to their urban counterparts, are relatively understudied and/or misunderstood in academic discourse and policy debates (Panelli et al. 2007; Jeffrey 2008; Punch 2015). These trends, however, may be shifting as some major development organisations focus on ‘youth’, and examine rural development and gender dynamics more closely (e.g., CTA and IFAD 2014; UNESCO 2016; UN Women 2017; FAO 2018).  This session builds upon both ‘troubled’ and ‘hopeful’ foci in policy and academic studies on rural youth transitions and mobility (e.g., Chant and Jones 2005; Crivello 2010; Punch and Sugden 2013; Cuervo and Wynn 2014; Farrugia 2016; Woronov 2016; Chea and Huijsmans 2018) to understand rural young people’s educational pathways for navigating opportunities, challenges and precarity. The session examines details about how these pathways affect localised and informal learning (e.g., Katz 2004), and the choices and alternatives young people have in education, training, and making a living.

This session explores how rural youth (including those in small towns) use and access various forms of mobility, education or training (e.g. vocational, technical, formal) to improve their skills for work, self-employment, further migration, etc., and the outcomes or consequences of such investments. Questions for analysis may include:

  • What are rural young people’s pathways for education and training, and where do they lead? 
  • What are the formal or informal skills rural young people acquire from these pathways; how are they used in their everyday lives to find work?
  • What are the effects of these investments in mobility, education and training on their families, natal villages, land uses and forests?
  • What are the negative and positive effects of rural youthful mobilities? For example, problems of debt or acquisition of cultural capital. What might be the short-term or long-term impacts?
  • How does ‘home place’, along with other social factors such as gender, ethnicity and age, affect their in/ability to become mobile, access education or employment resources?
  • What are the spatialities of where schools/training centres are based, subject areas, and types of student populations (e.g., vocational or tertiary; rural or urban)? What is learned, gained and un/successful?
  • How do differing types of migration (distance, time, type of work) affect connections to families, villages, labour and knowledge in natal land?
  • Why do young people return to rural areas?
  • What implications does this have for rural areas, rural development and rural young people’s futures?

The aim of this session is to address topics relating to young people’s current trajectories in rural areas.  We anticipate diverse research and discussions that center on rural youth’s hopes and troubles, obstacles and opportunities, that they must navigate in a wide variety of contexts and countries.  We look forward to discussing new methodologies and perspectives, and invite scholars from all academic (and non-academic) fields, including (but not limited to) human geography, political ecology, environmental sociology, anthropology, gender and women’s studies, youth studies, etc.

Interested participants should email: their names, affiliations, email addresses, paper titles and abstracts (250 words) to both Tracey Skelton (geost@nus.edu.sgand Jessica Clendenning (Jessica.clendenning@u.nus.edu) by Tuesday, February 12th.  We look forward to meeting you in London!

Meg Sherval (The University of Newcastle) on behalf of Tracey Skelton (National University of Singapore).

EOIS now open for Associate Editor of Geographical Research


23rd January 2019

GR logo

Geographical Research — Call for Expressions of Interest: Associate Editor (1)

About the journal

Geographical Research is the internationally-refereed publication of the Institute of Australian Geographers, the peak body representing academic and professional geographers in Australia. The primary objective of Geographical Research is to advance innovative, high-quality work that demonstrates the strengths and diversity of all parts of the discipline of Geography and allied fields and, in this endeavour, it also supports scholarship from the Institute’s several Study Groups. The Journal includes (but is not restricted to) academic papers, commentaries, book panels, and book reviews. It is published in February, May, August, and November each year by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. The Journal is managed by Editors appointed by the Council of the Institute. The Editor-in-Chief, Professor Elaine Stratford (University of Tasmania) works closely with Associate and Book Review Editors, respectively Professor Steve Turton (Central Queensland University), Dr Danielle Drozdzewski (Stockholm University), and Dr Kirstie Petrou (University of Tasmania, based in Adelaide).

Expression of Interest – Associate Editor

We are now seeking expressions of interest for another associate editor for the Journal. The Associate Editor will have a specialisation and the capacity to assess papers from other parts of geography and allied fields. For example, the team has recently worked on submissions related to ecology, food security, education, development studies, geomorphology, economic geography, and GIS. Thus, our new Associate Editor will be:

  • highly committed to geography and have a deep curiosity about allied fields;
  • passionate about reading, writing, publishing, and promoting the discipline widely;
  • able to work with a small team over distance;
  • able to devote four to eight hours a week to editorial duties including, but not limited to:

o   selecting reviewers;

o   liaising with reviewers and authors;

o   soliciting papers of all kinds produced by the journal; and

o   helping to assess special/themed/virtual issue proposals; and

  • able to travel to one annual meeting, typically in late January or early February, and join other members of the team and Editorial Board at geography conferences whenever possible.

To submit your Expressions of Interest

We welcome expressions of interest to become either an Associate Editor or member of the Editorial Board (you are welcome to apply for both). Write no more than one page that outlines your response to the points above. Add a current CV of no more than three pages that highlights relevant experience. Include a final page that lists the names and full contact details of two referees who have been made aware that they have been nominated. Please combine these documents into one PDF and send this jointly to Professor Elaine StratfordElaine.Stratford@utas.edu.au by close of business on Friday 1 February 2019. Selection will be made by the end of that month.

We look forward to receiving your expression of interest.

Elaine Stratford

Editor-in-Chief

 

CfP IAG2019: Spatialities of educational engagement


22nd January 2019

CFP: Spatialities of educational engagement, IAG 2019 Hobart

We take great pleasure in inviting submission of abstracts responding to the call for papers below to be held at the 2019 Institute of Australian Geographers Conference from 9-13 July in Hobart, Tasmania, and encourage you to pass this invitation to others in your networks.

Spatialities of educational engagement

Convenors: Elaine Stratford, Kitty Te Riele, Natalie Brown, Becky Shelley

Educational opportunities are known to enrich people’s chances to enjoy fulfilment over the lifecourse. As students, parents, educators, employers, volunteers, policy-makers, and members of diverse publics, each of us engages with early childhood, primary, secondary, and tertiary education. Evidence from many studies around the world has established that active engagement in education deepens the benefits derived from learning, and yet the spatialities are not as well understood as they could be. We welcome papers that “speak” to this point and consider, for example, educational engagement and: learning environments; locational (dis)advantage and spatial justice; participation, equity, and access; urban/rural/regional/island settings; the spatial dimensions of identity; and socio-spatial innovations in educational policy. Other relevant ideas most welcome.

Abstracts are due with the conference organizers no later than 28 February and may be lodged at https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts.

If you intend to submit an abstract, please also send your text to us so that we are aware in advance that the submission has been made.

We hope to engage scholars, policy-makers, and practitioners, and look forward to receiving your submission. If you have any questions about the conference please contact Elaine.Stratford@utas.edu.au in the first instance.

CfP IAG2019: Animal urban geographies of the Global South: Making spaces for, with and by non-humans


21st January 2019

CFP: Animal urban geographies of the Global South: Making spaces for, with and by non-humans, iAG 2019 Hobart

Session Title: Animal urban geographies of the Global South: Making spaces for, with and by non-humans

Convenor: Yamini Narayanan (Deakin University), Ashraful Alam (University of Otago)

Feminist geographical and urban studies have paid much attention to the vitalist agencies of non-humans (e.g., animals, plants and objects). With more-than-human and relational insights, non-humans are being acknowledged to generate more emancipatory political spaces where both human and non-human participate. This session asks how animals and plants can be seen as enablers of ‘subaltern’ political agencies to create inclusive spaces for themselves, but also human communities in marginalised and informal spaces? What kinds of intersections of different animals and plants with racialised, casteised and/or gendered humans (among others) be unearthed, and what can these tell us about new forms of urban identity politics? The session invites papers that include case studies and methodological approaches to explore the human-non-human interfaces in cities primarily in the global South, but also other regions.

Please submit your abstracts (150 words) online via the conference website  https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and email the session convenors y.narayanan@deakin.edu.auand ash.alam@otago.ac.nz .

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 28 February 2019.

With best wishes

Yamini Narayanan and Ashraful Alam

Ashraful Alam | PhD
Lecturer in Planning and Environmental Management, and MPlan Programme Coordinator
Department of Geography | Te Iho Whenua
University of Otago | Te Whare W?nanga o Ot?go
Tel/Waea +64 3 479 7717
Email/?mera ash.alam@otago.ac.nz
Website/Pae tukutuku www.researchgate.net/profile/Ashraful_Alam29/publications

CfP IAG2019: Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis


21st January 2019

CFP: Decolonising the University: Theory and Praxis

Session Organisers: Michele Lobo and Kaya Barry

(Sponsored by the Cultural Geography Study Group/Urban Geography Study Group)

Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2019 ‘Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence’

9-13  July 2019, Hobart, Tasmania  www.iagc2019.com

‘Once upon a time scholars assumed that if you ‘come’ from Latin America you have to ‘talk about’ Latin America; that in such a case you have to be a token of your culture. Such expectation will not arise if the author ‘comes’ from Germany, France, England or the US’

(Walter D Mignolo, 2009)

In this session we ask: If decolonisation is about proliferating planetary imaginaries of being and becoming otherwise, what are the practices we must engage in to decolonise the university. Such a question is crucial when neoliberal pressures and the reproduction of academic practices of privilege have the unintended effect of keeping racial hierarchies intact.  While focusing on the university might render us vulnerable, it is this site of vulnerability that has the capacity to mutate ‘decolonisation’ as more than another academic buzzword. Themes are unlimited but could include:

- Struggle and activism –e.g. @Rhodes must fall, #WeAreTheUniversity, https://www.smh.com.au/education/staff-left-betrayed-as-university-reveals-ramsay-centre-deal-20181217-p50msp.html

- Academic practices, the mundane and everyday decolonisation

- Geography, Geographers and Decolonisation in Australia

- Academic freedom and the politics of knowledge production

- Southern theory and global knowledge hierarchies 

Please submit your abstract (150 words) online via the conference website  https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and email the session convenors Michele Lobo michele.lobo@deakin.edu.au and Kaya Barry k.barry@griffith.edu.au with a copy. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 28 February 2019.
 

Dr Kaya Barry | University Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research 

Griffith University  | Nathan | QLD 4111 | Australia

T: +61 (0)7373 57692 | E: k.barry@griffith.edu.au  | Twitter: @kayathiea

CfP IAG2019: Mobilising colour in geographical research: Vibrancies, saturations, and more -than- visual methods


21st January 2019

CFP: Mobilising colour in geographical research: vibrancies, saturations, and more -than- visual methods

Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2019 ‘Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence’

9-13  July 2019, Hobart, Tasmania  www.iagc2019.com.

Sponsored by the Cultural Geography Study

Looking forward to some exciting conversations and discussions at IAG 2019 this year, on colour, saturation and movement. Please get in touch with Kaya Barry, Tim Edensor and/or myself if you have any questions. 

Please submit your abstract (150 words) online via the conference website https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and to the session convenors atk.barry@griffith.edu.au, d. bhattacharya@griffith.edu.au and t.edensor@mmu.ac.uk.

Kind Regards,

Diti 

CfP IAG2019: Place-based Climate Change Education


21st January 2019

CFP: Place-based Climate Change Education, IAG 2019 Hobart

Session Title: Place-based Climate Change Education

Sponsored by the Nature, Risk and Resilience Study Group

Convenor: Roger C. Baars (Kyoto University)

Increasing global environmental, social and economic risks due to climate change have resulted in climate change education (CCE) to be integrated into most geography syllabi today. Research on place-based education claims people who feel connected to their local environment show higher intentions to engage in pro-environmental actions and are more willing to change their behaviours. Therefore, this session aims to explore how to teach climate change in a way that translates the abstract and distant problem into everyday local experiences. Purpose of the session is to share current CCE practices and to explore their impact on students’ attitudes, perceptions and behaviours.

Please submit your abstracts (150 words maximum) via the official IAG conference website https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and also email the session convenor Roger Baars (baars.rogercloud.6a@kyoto-u.ac.jp). The deadline for submission of abstracts is 28 February 2019.

Cheers,

Roger

=================================

Roger C. BAARS (Ph.D.)
Senior Lecturer
Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
Kyoto University
Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
TEL: +81-75-753-5935

CfP IAG2019: Research assemblages: Thinking through the production of research


21st January 2019

CFP: Research assemblages: thinking through the production of research

Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2019 ‘Geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence’ 9-13  July 2019, Hobart, Tasmania  www.iagc2019.com

Session: Research assemblages: thinking through the production of research

Convener: Susannah Clement, University of Wollongong, sclement@uow.edu.au

Study Group: Cultural Geography

All research is mediated through a research-assemblage comprised of ‘bodies, things and abstractions that get caught up in social inquiry, including the events that are studied, the tools, models and precepts of research, and the researchers’ (Fox and Alldred 2015). This session calls for papers which consider the messy ways research is done through assemblages of bodies, materials, emotions, ideas and agendas. Papers might consider how research assemblages shape ethics processes, questions, methods, participant selection, empirical analysis, writing or publishing. Interested in playfully engaging with the idea of the research assemblage, the session welcomes a broad range of intersectional approaches.

Please submit your abstract (150 words) online via the conference website https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts and email the session convener sclement@uow.edu.au by 28 February 2019.

You're welcome to contact me directly with any questions. 

Dr Susannah Clement
Australian Centre for Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS)
University of Wollongong, Australia

IAG 2019 Hobart: Call for Abstracts now open


21st January 2019

Call for Abstracts Open

Call for Abstracts Open for IAG 2019, Hobart

Dear geographers and friends of geography,

we are pleased to invite abstracts for papers and/or presentations for the Institute of Australian Geographers Conference 2019 – at Wrest Point in Hobart.

The theme of the conference is geographies of emergence, divergence and convergence. We have some amazing international and local keynote speakers, including Jennifer Wolch (University of California, Berkeley), Janelle Knox-Hayes (MIT), Greg Lehman (University of Melbourne), Sangeetha Chandra-Shekeran (University of Melbourne), and Jamie Kirkpatrick (University of Tasmania) – among others.

Session proposals have been submitted for the conference by the Institute of Australian Geographers study groups. The breadth of the sessions attests to the diverse interests in our discipline and the sessions are well-aligned to the conference theme. We invite you to submit the abstract for your paper/presentation to the session that best suits the theme of your paper.

https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/abstracts

If you are submitting an abstract which is not aligned to a session, please choose the ‘open/unaligned’ option.

The local organising committee for the conference will review all submitted abstracts after the closing date, in consultation with the IAG study group convenors (where relevant), to assess their fit with the conference and nominated session.

Paper presentations are limited to 15 minute presentations and 5 minutes for questions as the default, but there will be some sessions that have a call for papers where there are fewer papers and more time allocated for presentations (subject to time and venue availability). Some sessions may be managed according to interest, gauged by the number of abstract submissions, and the conference program will be adjusted accordingly.

We look forward to receiving your abstract and to seeing you in Hobart!
Jason Byrne and Aidan Davison, on behalf of the Local Organising Committee.

2019 Applied Geography Commission (AGC) meeting: Abstracts close 1 February


20th January 2019

AGCmeetingflyer

Dear AGC Colleagues,

I wanted to update you on our 2019 Applied Geography Commission (AGC) meeting before the end of the year. Please find  the meeting timeline:

timeline

 

When: 17th to 19th June, 2019

Where: Gran Sasso Science Institute, L’Aquila, Italy.

AGC meeting that will be L’Aquila, Italy (June 17th – 19th, 2019) and very kindly hosted by the GSSI – flyer for this event is attached and details posted on our website: https://agcigu.wordpress.com/

 

Cost: €300; Partner fee, €160 

The conference fee includes morning & afternoon tea, lunch, evening meals, a walking tour of L’Aquila and a half day excursion to Rocca Calascio, Santo Stenano di Sessanio and Bominaco. 

The partner fee covers evening meals, walking tour of L’Aquila and the half day excursion

Payment: The web link for the conference fee payment will be circulated as soon as it becomes available.

Getting to L’Aquila: Please find attached information that will help you to get to our conference venue, the Gran Sasso Science Institute in L’Aquila.

travel instructions

Accommodation:  A special conference rate is available at the following 3 hotels:

1. Hotel L’Aquila**** €70 per night

2. Hotel San Michele***  €60 per night

3. Hotel Castello*** €65 per night

For further information on accommodation please contact our local hosts: Dr Giulia Urso (giulia.urso@gssi.it) or Dr Gloria Cicerone (gloria.cicerone@gssi.it).

Abstract submission: Open NOWCloses 1st February, 2019. Email abstracts to me at: jj.corcoran@uq.edu.au

Happy holidays and look forward to seeing you in L’Aquila in 2019.

Best wishes,
Jonathan

Professor Jonathan Corcoran 
Secretary, Applied Geography Commission
Director, Queensland Centre for Population Research
Co-Editor, Australian Population Studies

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences | University of Queensland | St Lucia | Queensland | Australia | 4072 
Tel: +61(0)7 3365 6517 | Fax: +61(0)7 3365 6899 | Email: jj.corcoran@uq.edu.au


For more information download this document

IAG 2019 Hobart: Cultural Study Group welcomes your session proposals (50-100 words description)


9th January 2019
By Michele Lobo, Michelle Duffy and Vickie Zhang

Dear Friends

Best wishes for the New Year.

Looking forward to your participation at IAG 2019, Hobart. The Cultural Study Group welcomes your session proposals (50-100 words description). 

Please get in touch and upload your session proposal on the IAG website by the extended deadline which is Thursday 10 Jan 2019. Details here: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/sessions . Some of you have already uploaded your sessions on the website..thanks very much! 

Theme:  Geographies of Emergence, Divergence, and Convergence

Dates: July 9-13, July, 2019

Hashtag is #IAG2019Hobart.

Michele Lobo, Michelle Duffy and Vickie Zhang

IGU Urban Geography Commission annual meeting


9th January 2019

IGU Urban Geography Commission annual meeting

d4 to 9 August 2019 - LUXEMBOURG

URBAN CHALLENGES IN A COMPLEX WORLD 

The urban geographies of the new economy, services industries and financial market places

The Urban Commission of the International Geographical Union (IGU) in collaboration with the Urban Studies team of the Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Luxembourg, is pleased to invite you to its 2019 Annual Conference, taking place on

 

the LUXEMBOURG University’s Campus Belval in Esch-sur-Alzette

Deadline for abstract submission: 31 January 2019

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Papers are invited to address the special topic 'The urban geographies of the new economy, services industries and financial market places

Our aim is to emphasise urban-regional development patterns and phenomena under the influence of economic change, digitalisation, multi-level governance and sustainability imperatives. Besides focusing on services and tech capitals as well as financial market places, this includes related processes that are shaping cities in most general terms.”

 

Besides, participants can submit individual papers, and/or proposals for panel sessions/roundtables, that are linked to the following thematic foci of the Urban Commission: 

1- Complex urban systems and processes of cities’ transformation 

2- Technological innovations, creative activities in cities 

3- Innovative and smart building and transportation in cities 

4- Polycentrism, small and medium-sized cities 

5- Sustainable to resilient cities 

6- Shrinking and aging cities 

7- Urban governance, planning and participative democracy 

8- Contested social spaces 

9- Subjective/objective well-being in cities 

10- Urban Heritage and Conservation 

11- New concepts and methods in urban studies 

 

Abstracts (around 2-3 pages) should include the following elements: 

• Theoretical background 

• Research questions 

• Methodology 

• Results/findings 

• Significant/general conclusions 

More detailed scientific and material information available on the commission website

 

Please submit your abstract following the recommendations indicated on the website. 

 

SUBMISSION AND INFORMATION

 

Only abstracts submitted via the platform will be accepted

 

GRANT FOR YOUNG RESEARCHERS

Early career researchers are considered before PhD completion or within 5 years after.

The Commission provides grants to help defray the costs of young participation to the Conference. Please note that, due to limited availability of funds, the IGU Travel Grants provide only the contribution to registration. 

In selecting applicants to receive awards, preference will be given to young or emerging scholars, in particular to those from developing countries. Because the funds available for this awards program are extremely limited, all applicants will be required to find the balance of the costs of participation; applications for 100% support cannot be funded. Please note that full participation in the conference, including the closing ceremony, is required. 

 

The selection will be made according to an extended abstract of 5-6 pages (longer than the regular abstract). The application to the grant must be indicated in the registration form and in the beginning of the abstract form. The template of abstract is the same, but the abstract must be more consistent in order to better judge of the content.

 

 

We will be delighted to welcome you to this conference,

 

Celine Rozenblat & Markus Hesse 

----------------------------------------------------------------------
  
Céline ROZENBLAT           
  Professor

  Chair of the Urban Geography Commission 

  of the International Geographical Union

                           
  
UNIVERSITY OF LAUSANNE  
  
Institute of Geography and Sustainability - Director

  Faculty of Geoscience and Environment
  Geopolis Building- office 3614      
  Mouline area       
  CH - 1015 LAUSANNE 

  SWITZERLAND

      
  

Tel   : 41 (0)21 692 36 13 
Cel   : 41 (0)79 777 05 01
Fax   : 41 (0)21 692 30 75 
Email: celine.rozenblat@unil.ch
http://www.unil.ch/unisciences/celinerozenblat

ORCID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5364-4403
BLOG: http://wp.unil.ch/citadyne-news/
SKYPE: Celine Rozenblat
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Extension for Call for Sessions until 10 January 2019


19th December 2018

extension

IAG 2019 Hobart: Conference Registrations now Open for and Call for Sessions closes 20 December


12th December 2018
Dear geographers and friends of geography,
You can now register for the Institute of Australian Geographers Conference, ‘Geographies of Emergence, Divergence, and Convergence’, Hobart 9-13 July, 2019.
To register go to: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/registration
 
For up-to-date information about the Conference go to the conference website: http://www.iagc2019.com

IAG 2019 Hobart: Conference Registrations now Open for and Call for Sessions closes 20 December

 

 

Dear geographers and friends of geography,

You can now register for the Institute of Australian Geographers Conference, ‘Geographies of Emergence, Divergence, and Convergence’, Hobart 9-13 July, 2019.

To register go to: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/registration

For up-to-date information about the Conference go to the conference website: http://www.iagc2019.com

A reminder that session proposals, including panels (e.g. author meets critics), can be submitted via the conference website by selecting the Call for Sessions tab. The deadline for the Call for Sessions is 20 December, 2018.

We are looking forwards to you joining us in Hobart in 2019.

Jason Byrne and Aidan Davison
On behalf of the Local Organising Committee
and University of Tasmania, Geography and Spatial Sciences
December 12, 2018

Call for Sessions Open for IAG2019 Hobart, Tasmania


27th November 2018
By Jason Byrne and Aidan Davison

CALL FOR SESSIONS OPEN FOR IAG2019 HOBART, TASMANIA

Dear geographers and friends of geography,

the local organising committee of the Institute of Australian Geographers Conference, Hobart 9-13, 2019 is pleased to open the call for conference sessions.

The theme of the conference is Geographies of Emergence, Divergence, and Convergence.

Hashtag is #IAG2019Hobart.

Session proposals, including panels (e.g. author meets critics), are to be submitted via the conference website: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag

To submit a session proposal, you select the Call for Sessions tab on the webpage (https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag/sessions), and then navigate to the Call for Session button, which will take you to a submission form.

In the near future, we will have a short piece in Geographical Research, which elucidates the conference theme further. The conference website already has some signposts for you to consider, including definitions and supporting text and images. It would be great if you could be mindful of the theme when thinking about sessions.

Study group members are encouraged to discuss session proposals with study group leaders – as the theme has been designed to be as inclusive as possible across physical and human geography, while speaking to the particularities of Tasmania – and contemporary global events.

The Conference will be held at the Wrest Point Conference Centre in Sandy Bay, Hobart, from July 9-13, with the conference days on the 10th-12th of July, and fieldtrips on the 13th. Pre-conference activities will occur on the 8th and 9th of July. The conference dinner is scheduled for the 11th. Further information will be updated on the conference website: conference website: https://cdesign.eventsair.com/2019-iag

The conference venue has capacity for 7 parallel sessions. Depending on the number of proposed sessions, and endorsements from study groups, we may have to do a little curating to ensure that sessions and abstracts are matched to venue capacity. This is not intended as a limitation, but please keep this in mind.

We have already confirmed some exciting international and local keynotes, including Carolyn FinneyGreg LehmanJanelle Knox-Hayes, and Jamie Kirkpatrick. More to follow.

We are looking forwards to you joining us in Hobart in 2019.

Jason Byrne and Aidan Davison
On behalf of the Local Organising Committee
and University of Tasmania, Geography and Spatial Sciences

November 27, 2018

Australian Academy of Science - Media Release - Geography: Shaping Australia’s Future


23rd November 2018
Media Release - Australian Academy of Science - Geography: Shaping Australia’s Future November 22, 2018

Website: Media Release - Australian Academy of Science - Geography: Shaping Australia’s Future

Launch of Geography. Shaping Australia’s Future held at the University of Sydney


23rd November 2018
By Bev Clarke

Yesterday it was a great pleasure to attend the launch of Geography. Shaping Australia’s Future held at the University of Sydney.

Produced by the National Committee for Geographical Sciences under the auspices of the Australian Academy of Science, Geography. Shaping Australia’s Future, is the decadal plan for Geography in Australia. This strategic plan, explains the contribution that geography makes to the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of Australians and Australia through research, education, training, skills, expertise and engagement with industry and the community.

The plan was four years in the making, led by Dr Alaric Maude, but involving a collective of Australian geographers.

The plan’s web link is:

https://www.science.org.au/supporting-science/science-policy-and-sector-analysis/reports-and-publications/geography-shaping

The IAG commends the work of all those involved in bringing the plan to its fruition.

Geography. Shaping Australia’s Future is intended for a broad audience so please, circulate widely.

Bev Clarke

Launch of the Decadal Plan for Geography


23rd November 2018

The launch of the decadal plan: "Geography: Shaping Australia’s Future", prepared by the National Committee for Geographical Sciences of the Australian Academy of Science was held 22 November 2018 at University of Sydney, hosted by Future Earth Australia.

The plan’s web link is: https://www.science.org.au/supporting-science/science-policy-and-sector-analysis/reports-and-publications/geography-shaping

Expressions of Interest: Science Meets Parliament


22nd November 2018

Expressions of Interest: Science Meets Parliament

Science and Technology Australia host a two-day “Science meets Parliament” event in March every year, where decision makers and professionals in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) meet to share their insights with others including Members of Parliament. 

The Institute of Australian Geographers sends two delegates each year.  If you are interested in applying to be a delegate, please send a brief statement (no more than one page) addressing the eligibility criteria and conditions.

Eligibility criteria and conditions:

You will be a current financial member of the IAG and have a demonstrated capacity to:

  • articulate the relevance of geography with STEM professionals, policy makers and parliamentarians
  • promote the role of geography in STEM education, the public sector and community. 
  • advocate persuasively for the future needs of geographers and the discipline of geography.

Please submit no more than one page outlining your response to these criteria and a budget for reasonable expenses by no later than Friday 7th December to the immediate Past President, Ian Rutherfurd, on idruth@unimelb.edu.au

Expressions of interest will be voted on by members of the IAG Council and the successful applicants notified by 14th December.

Successful applicants are required to also provide no more than a one-page summary of your experience for the subsequent April newsletter, outlining your participation and reflections on the event.

More information is available at:
https://scienceandtechnologyaustralia.org.au/what-we-do/science-meets-parliament/

II Victorian Geographical Student Conference


12th November 2018
By Ian Rutherfurd

 II Victorian Geographical Student Conference, to be held on November 29 at Melbourne University, Theatre 3, FBE. To check the final program and register, please follow this link: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/ii-victorian-geographical-student-conference-tickets-52195498140?utm_campaign=new_event_email

Call for nominations for the Award of the Fellowship of the Institute of Australian Geographers (FIAG)


11th August 2018

This call for nominations for the Award of the Fellowship of the Institute of Australian Geographers (FIAG) was sent to members via email on 10 August. 

This award recognizes sustained service to the profession of geography in Australia. Applicants must have at least ten years membership of the Institute, and be a current member. Applications should comprise a statement (of no more than 1000 words), accompanied by no more than five pages of a curriculum vitae.
 In these documents applicants must provide evidence to Council of their contributions to the geography profession with respect to at least one of the following:
 a. Meritorious professional employment and/or service as a Geographer At least ten years employment and/or service following the award of a relevant degree, of which at least five years have involved a position of major responsibility in any aspect of geography (including in industry, government, consultancy, education or community organisation).
 b. Significant advances in Geography At least ten years employment and/or service following the award of a relevant degree, of which at least five have involved research activities that have contributed significantly to Australian geographical knowledge or policy development.
 c. Significant  contribution to development of Geography At least ten years employment and/or service following the award of a relevant degree with substantial service to Geography of at least five years at a senior level in a representative and/ or administrative role, including for the Institute or for government, industry, academic bodies or professional organisations relevant to Geography or where sustained contribution to the professional development of Geographers can be shown. 
Fellows pay the same membership fee as Members, and are entitled to use the postnominal, FIAG.
More information is available at https://www.iag.org.au/ awards-of-the-iag

The closing date for nominations is Friday 23 November, 2018
Nominations should be sent to the Honorary Secretary, Jennifer Carter, at jcarter@usc.edu.au 
For further enquiries about these awards, please contact either the IAG President, Beverley Clarke beverley.clarke@finders.edu.au or the Secretary, Jennifer Carter, at jcarter@usc.edu.au

The 2018 Recipient of the Australia-International Medal


2nd August 2018

AWARDS OF THE IAG: The 2018 Recipient of the Australia-International Medal

The next call for this award will be in early 2019.

Congratulations to Professor Mark Wang who received the IAG Australia-International Medal, awarded for outstanding contributions by Australian geographers to geography world-wide, or by geographers outside Australia to the geography of Australia. For over twenty years, from his base at the University of Melbourne, Mark has made an outstanding contribution to knowledge about China, the geographical study of China and Chinese geography. In so doing, he has collaborated with a substantial number of Australian academics and research students, introducing them to research on China and facilitating their access to it. We have watched with enormous admiration as he has made these contributions through a long engagement with detailed and extensive empirical (field) work, which has principally focused on two themes -- [A] urban development -- China’s land acquisition, resettlement / displacement, rural-urban migration, urban transformation/regional planning; and [B] the management of water.

Mark was nominated by Jon Barnett, Brian Finlayson, Sarah Rogers and Sophie Webber.

Academy of Science’s, National Committee for Geography, Strategic Plan for the Geographical Sciences is now very close to publication


1st August 2018
The long awaited, and much anticipated, Academy of Science’s, National Committee for Geography, Strategic Plan for the Geographical Sciences is now very close to publication. An anticipated release date is November 2018. This important work will provide the Geography community, including the IAG, with a suite of ideas and recommendations to prompt action and garner widespread support for the discipline.

Congratulations to award winners of the ‘Outstanding Postgraduate Student Presentation at the IAG Conference’


1st August 2018

Congratulations to award winners of the ‘Outstanding Postgraduate Student Presentation at the IAG Conference’, for papers delivered at the joint NZGS/IAG Auckland Conference in July 2018. Awardees will receive a certificate acknowledging their achievement. Congratulations go to: Bronwyn Bate (University of Western Sydney), Ananth Gopal (University of Wollongong), Elliot Child (University of British Columbia), Rebecca Campbell (University of New South Wales), Victoria Radnell (Monash University), Jerome Ofori (University of Adelaide), Yuan, Zhenjie (University of Melbourne), Carrie Wilkinson (University of Wollongong), Karen Paiva Henrique (University of Western Australia), Peter Kamstra (University of Melbourne). The papers delivered by IAG student members provided some of the highlights of the Auckland Conference. Overall, these papers were of a high standard, and covered a variety of important topics form multi-ethnic encounters in China, to the practices of homemaking amongst renters in Sydney, to the consideration of interrogation records. The ten winners came from eight different universities, demonstrating the spread of strong student researchers in geography across Australia. 

New IAG Council Members


1st August 2018

Additions, farewells and reshuffles to IAG Council:

At the July 2018 joint NZGS/IAG conference in Auckland, Beverley Clarke took over from Ian Rutherfurd as President of the IAG. At the Auckland handover, there were several other additions, farewells and reshuffes. We welcomed Meg Sherval (The University of Newcastle), Catherine Phillips (The University of Melbourne) and Charishma Ratnam (University of New South Wales) and farewelled Steve Turton (Central Queensland University), Aidan Davison (University of Tasmania) and Leah Gibbs (University of Wollongong). This latest confguration of Council retains much corporate knowledge with the continuation of Ian Rutherfurd, Robyn Bartel, Paul McFarland, Jen Carter, Tod Jones, Hugo Bekle, Julie Kesby and Elissa Waters, albeit almost all in new roles. I very much look forward to working with this new team for the next two years. To the vacating members of Council, it is important to acknowledge your considerable contribution. Thank you for your wise ideas, hard work, conviviality and commitment to the Institute.


Beverley Clarke, IAG President Flinders University, beverley.clarke@finders.edu.au 

Next IAG Conference in Tasmania


1st August 2018
The next IAG conference is to be hosted by the University of Tasmania from July 9-3, 2019, exactly one decade since the IAG met in Hobart for this event. Keep an eye out for further updates and the invitation for abstracts.

STEM leaders forge path to stronger Australian science and technology


3rd May 2018
By Science & Technology Australia (STA)


Presidents, CEOs and other leaders of Australia’s most prominent science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) organisations gathered in Canberra to highlight the important role that science and technology will play in Australia’s future.
They released the following statement:

https://scienceandtechnologyaustralia.org.au/stem-leaders-forge-path-to-stronger-australian-science-and-technology/?utm_source=President+and+CEO+Forum&utm_campaign=6d8d926f7b-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_04_23&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d6970c40d0-6d8d926f7b-579909573

 

Geographical Research Impact Factor released


20th June 2017
By Professor Elaine Stratford

Some great news concerning our journal Geographical Research from our Editor and Wiley. The 2016 Thomson ISI Journal Citation Report was released overnight and Geographical Research's 2016 Impact Factor has increased to 1.677. This result ranks the journal 33/79 in the Geography category.

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